goods_and_service_procurement_practice_guide.doc

The apcc framework defines sustainable procurement as

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The APCC Framework defines sustainable procurement as “… a process whereby organisations meet their needs for products, services, works and utilities in a way that achieves value for money on a whole of life basis in terms of generating benefits not only for the organisation, but also to society and the economy, whilst minimising damage to the environment.” This definition was developed by the United Kingdom Government commissioned Sustainable Procurement Taskforce in 2006. Key Sustainable Procurement Principles At a high level, the APCC Framework is built around four broad principles of sustainable procurement. The Framework recommends that these principles should underpin the development and implementation of sustainable procurement strategies, policies, guidelines and tools. Accordingly, the information and advice in this appendix endeavours to reflect the following four key principles: adopt strategies to avoid unnecessary consumption and manage demand; in the context of whole of life value for money, select products and services which have lower environmental impacts across their life cycle compared with competing products and services; foster a viable Australia and New Zealand market for sustainable products and services by supporting businesses and industry groups that demonstrate innovation in sustainability; and support suppliers to government who are socially responsible and adopt ethical practices. Sustainable procurement dimensions Sustainable procurement comprises three dimensions: social, environmental and economic sustainability and aims to reduce the adverse environmental, social and economic impacts of purchased products and services throughout their life. Examples of environmental, social and economic impacts are: inputs of natural resources, energy and water in the manufacture, use and disposal of products; pollution produced from the manufacture, use and disposal of products; costs of operation and maintenance over the life of the products; labour conditions in the manufacture, use and disposal of products or delivery of services; and loss of flora and fauna resulting from the removal or alteration of natural resources. 89 Ver. December 2017 Appendix
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Sustainable procurement looks beyond the up-front cost to make purchasing decisions based on the entire life cycle of the products and services, taking into account associated costs, environmental and social risks and benefits, and broader social and environmental implications. Figure 1: Examples of key considerations in sustainable procurement decisions. Environmental Overview Environmentally preferable products and services are defined as those that have a lower impact on the environment over the life cycle of the product or service, when compared with competing products or services serving the same purpose.
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