Employees at such organizations are likely to be

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state of chaos. Employees at such organizations are likely to be unhappy. Krajewski, L., Malhorta, M. & Ritzman, L. (2016). Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, Eleventh Edition . Pearson Education, New York, NY. Thread: Question 25 ­ Buettner Post: RE: Question 25 ­ Buettner Author: Posted Date: December 7, 2015 1:00 AM Status: Published (Post is Read) Perfect Answer, I couldn’t have said it better! When I read about nested processes in our text I immediately thought of an assembly plant. For example an auto maker needs to put in seats, an instrument panel, and audio system. Each one of these components has a process to assemble from plastic molding to making electrical connections. Once the nested process is complete the main process can continue. You make an excellent point in that each department should develop a timeline or schedule to make sure their nested processes are complete so the main process can continue. It is my experience that operation managers goal is to make sure the main process flows unhindered. When a department or service fails in ensuring their nested process is completed the operations manager turns into firefighting mode; they are reactive instead of proactive. The OM puts out the fires as soon as possible to keep things moving. Christopher Holder Thread: Question 25 ­ Buettner Post: RE: Question 25 ­ Buettner Author: Posted Date: December 7, 2015 8:07 PM Status: Published Hi Jenna, Nice job on the post. The way I see it, the output of some of the nested processes are used as the input of the next process. As Chris said, one would think of manufacturing as a good example and that is true. However, I work for William Dempsey
2/21/2016 Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (... ; 18/30 (Post is Read) a software company and it also applies to some of our internal processes. For example, we provide customizations for our software. But there are several processes that need to complete before we can submit a contract to a customer to move the process forward (no pun intended). Before we can provide a contract, we need to understand the cost, and before we determine the cost, we need to understand the requirements. Each of these are a process in itself, so if you look at the contract process for a customization, the estimating and requirements are nested (or sub) processes. It appears that you could look at everything that really has an input and output and refer to it as a process. And it is very easy to see the nested processes. The one point in my example is that the next process need to wait until the previous process completes. In many companies, these can be parallel but not in the example I used.

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