President abraham lincoln met stowe in 1862 he is

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President Abraham Lincoln met Stowe in 1862, he is supposed to have said: “So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war.”Like Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Tubman was one of 11 children. Both of Harriet Tubman’s parents were slaves on a plantation in Maryland. Tubman began working at six years old, rented out by her “master” as a weaver. As a teenager, she began working in the fields of the plantation. She suffered many beatings at the hands of the plantation’s overseers, which caused permanent damage. Learning that the plantation owner planned to sell her and her brothers,she decided to escape. Guided only by the North Star in the sky, she made her way to Pennsylvania, frequently on foot. But Tubman was not content simply to live in freedom. She became active in the Underground Railroad Harriet Beecher Stowe had written about.Just one year after her own escape, she returned to the South to rescue her sister and her sister’s two children. Then she returned once again for one of her brothers. Sometime later, she returned yet again to rescue her parents. It was notjust her family she helped to become free. She wanted to help other slaves to escape. She returned to the South 19 times. The exact number of slaves that Tubman led to freedom is unknown; a 19thcentury biography stated that she rescued 300 slaves, while modern historians estimate the total was closer to 70.During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union Army as a nurse and a cook. She also became a spy. In one daring mission, she learned the position of the Confederate Army along the Combahee River in South Carolina and traveled on a gunboat with hundreds of Union Army soldiers as they freed about 750 slaves.

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