What is a valid measure of good client service If the measure used only

What is a valid measure of good client service if the

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those everyday tasks that can take time but are often overlooked as significant accomplishments. What is a valid measure of good client service? If the measure used only considers the number of clients served (i.e. what was done), then the quality of service or how well it was done is not captured. Assessing both "what" and "how" would be a more valid measure for good customer service. For example, in addition to the number of clients served, the quality of the information provided and a complaint rate of 1% or less could represent good client service. To assess quality of information provided, the supervisor could do spot checks to listen to or look at the information that the employee provides to clients. The supervisor would then assess accuracy and completeness of the information. Objectives and indicators need to be SMART Specific Specify clearly what is to be done, when it is to be done, who is to accomplish it and how much is to be accomplished. Measurable Ask questions such as: How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished? Multiple measures should be used if possible, for example, quantity, quality, time frame and cost. Attainable Assure there is reasonable path to achievement and feasible odds that you will get there.
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Realistic The objective needs should match the level of complexity with the employee's experience and capability and no insurmountable forces outside the control of the employee should hinder its accomplishment. Time-bound Be clear about the time frame in which performance objectives are to be achieved. In most cases, objectives are to be completed by the end of the performance review period. Writing SMART objectives: Action verb + Object of the action verb + Measures Example: For an employee who is responsible for supervising volunteers at a drop-in centre for youth. SMART Objective 1: Conduct monitoring visits to the drop-in centre on a monthly basis to assess the performance of the five volunteers against the plans and objectives that were developed with them. SMART Objective 2: Provide written updates on the work of the volunteers to the Program Manager on a quarterly basis. Not SMART: Visit the drop-in centre and see how the volunteers are doing. Back to top Phase 2 — Monitor For a performance management system to be effective, employee progress and performance must be continuously monitored. Monitoring day-to-day performance does not mean watching over every aspect of how employees carry out assigned activities and tasks. Managers should not micro-manage employees, but rather focus their attention on results achieved, as well as individual behaviors and team dynamics affecting the work environment. During this phase, the employee and manager should meet regularly to: Assess progress towards meeting performance objectives Identify any barriers that may prevent the employee from accomplishing performance objectives and what needs to be done to overcome them Share feedback on progress relative to the goals Identify any changes that may be required to the work plan as a result of a shift in organization
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