Nevertheless Residential Schools continued to taint Canadas human rights record

Nevertheless residential schools continued to taint

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Nevertheless, Residential Schools continued to taint Canada’s human rights record until 1996, when the last IRS closed its doors for good. Upon graduating from Residential Schools, many students were left scarred by years of abuse and neglect. Failure to find occupation outside of reserves further deteriorated their situation, as discrimination was still widespread against Indigenous communities (Bombay et al., 2013). The separation of children from their parents prevented many Indigenous youths from developing strong parenting skills. Instead, the caregiver model exhibited by IRS instructors and administrators was characterized by an abusive and neglectful relationship between the caregivers and their students (Elias et al., 2012). For generations Indigenous children grew up not experiencing love, family, or support. Further their ideas of what these are became tainted by their experiences in residential school, that a caregiver could also be an abuser and that it was normal. ( perhaps find a link betwen abusers and victims, and how they form mishapen ideas of what love is and looks like.) Furthermore, the loss of Indigenous languages and culture aided in the “disrupt [ion] ed of the transmission of I i ndigenous knowledge to subsequent generations” (Elias et al., 2012). The A combination of these factors has resulted in a “legacy of alcohol and drug abuse problems, feelings of hopelessness, dependency, isolation, low self-esteem, suicide behaviors, prostitution, gambling, homelessness, sexual abuse, and violence” amongst Residential School survivors (Elias et al., 2012). The far- reaching repercussions of the IRS system have directly resulted in the transmission of trauma to subsequent Indigenous generations, which is epitomized by the many socioeconomic challenges faced by Indigenous communities in modern-day Canada.
Within the scope of literature concerning Indian Residential Schools, there exists a widespread consensus exists amongst scholars on the ir detrimental intergenerational impact of such schools. . Compared to the general population, Indigenous communities in Canada are faced with higher rates of depression and suicide, poverty and unemployment, drug abuse, sexual violence, and homelessness (Bombay et al., 2013; Bombay et al., 2011). These statistics suggest the presence of a variety of stressors ( define this) that continue to severely impact IRS survivors, as well as subsequent generations. These include the presence of stressors in both childhood and adulthood, as the Residential School system has greatly reduced the “capacity of IRS survivors to socialize the next generation to cultural norms and practices, including parenting skills” (Bombay et al., 2011). Researchers have attempted to empirically identify a direct causal relationship between attendance at an IRS and the presence of associated stressors. The evidence demonstrates that IRS survivors are “more likely to suffer from various physical and mental problems compared to those who did not attend” (Bombay et al., 2011). Furthermore, the impact

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