There are often modified to incorporate local produce

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 8 pages.

are variation on the cuisine and cooking styles brought to the island from elsewhere.There are often modified to incorporate local produce. Others are novel and developedlocally. Popular Jamaican dishes includes; Ackee and salt fish (national dish), made fromthe local fruit ackee and dried salted cod. This is the national dish of Jamaica. It is often
served with boiled unripe bananas, boiled yams, Jamaican fried dumplings or roastedbreadefru9it. Bammy, is a kind of savory cassava bread. Breadfruit, served roasted, friedor boiled. Callaloo, Jamaican spinach-like veggie, dumpling, served boiled, baked orfried. Curry goat, cornbread, coco bread, green bananas, Jamaican beef patties, oxtail,porridge amongst others. The Yoruba diet consist of starchy tubers, grains and plantains.These are supplemented by vegetable oils, wild and cultivated fruits and vegetables, meatand fish. The daily family diet relies on cassava, taro, maize, beans, plantains. One of themost popular foods is fufu (foo-foo), similar to dumpling, but made of cassava. The wayand manner the foods are prepared and eaten says a lot about the Yoruba culture. Mostfoods are eaten with bare hands, although some can be eaten with cutleries. It is commonto Yoruba’s to sit on a mat laid on the floor to eat, especially in the villages, but in thecities, foods are eaten on the dining table. The Yoruba’s believe that it is not proper to talkwhile eating, as the food is mostly prepared with lots of pepper. There is a popularYoruba proverb that’s says “The soul that does not eat pepper is a powerless soul”common Yoruba foods include: Eba (cassava flour), Amala (yam flour), Iyan (poundedyam), gaari, asaro, brown and white beans, rice, plantains, potatoes. Soups include:gbegiri (bean soup), ewedu, tomatoes stew, okra, efo riro (vegetable soup). PopularYoruba meats includes chicken, goat meat, beef, pork and bush meat (animals killedduring hunting).Cultural adaption: Living in a new culture can be jarring and very difficult to process,especially if it is drastically different from your own. A person that is being introducedinto to a new culture can feel a variety of different sensations. One may feel frustratedbecause she or he cannot communicate or become angry because some certain cultural
norms do not make sense.I choose to learn from Alana’s cultural background and get toknow Jamaica a bit more, if peradventure life or my job takes me to the beautiful islandof Jamaica, it will be easier for me to adapt and the new culture will not come as a shockor surprise to me, even though, both Jamaican and my Yoruba culture tends to have somesimilarities.Conclusion.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture