Globalization and its challenge to democracy benjamin

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Imperialist.
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Globalization and Its Challenge to Democracy Benjamin Barber, in his article Jihad vs. McWorld , suggests that the two axial principals of our age—tribalism and globalism—clash at every point except one: they may both be threatening to democracy. Barber’s discussion of “Jihad” presents a social/cultural outlook on globalization, while his presentation of “McWorld” illustrates an economic point of view. Samuel Huntington, in The Class of Civilizations , views globalization from a cultural angle, suggesting that the fundamental source of conflict in the new world will be cultural, not ideological or economic. Taken together, Barber and Huntington offer a window on the status of the debate over democracy and its standing in the world from the end of the Cold War to the present. But how was globalization viewed during and before the Cold War? Moreover, how have these views changed over the past fifty years? Servan-Schreiber, in his novel The American Challenge (1968), confronts globalization or “Americanization” from an economic standpoint, criticizing America for its imperialist, monopolistic expansion in France. Lastly, Nikolai Novikov, a Soviet ambassador to the United States, declares in a telegram sent to the USSR that American globalization is actually an effort to establish world dominance. All in all, by analyzing these four texts, each written from a different perspective (social, political, or economic), we can see how the term globalization has evolved from the Cold War to present day. During the start of the Cold War in the late 1940’s, America was increasing expenditures on the army and navy, building nearly 500 new bases in the Atlantic and
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Pacific, and dispatching naval vessels throughout major European ports. All of these actions taken by the United States signaled the beginning of the Cold War. Novikov, who presents a political view of globalization, reacts by declaring, “All of these facts show clearly that a decisive role in the realization of plans for world dominance by the United States is played by its armed forces” (Novikov, 402). According to Novikov, globalization really meant imperialism and world dominance by the United States. Thus, globalization could not have represented an opportunity for the historic project of democracy. Novikov states, “The United States attempts, at various international conferences or directly in these countries themselves, to support reactionary forces with the purpose of creating obstacles to the process of democratization of these countries” (Novikov, 402). On the whole, Novikov views American globalization as an obstacle to democracy and not on opportunity for democracy. Twenty-two years later (1968), Servan-Schreiber states that American industry in the 1960’s acted in imperialist ways by restraining French creativity, technology, and culture. He writes, “A nation holding a monopoly of power would look on imperialism as a kind of duty, and would take its own success as proof that the rest of the world should follow its example” (Schreiber, 102).
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