Concept Speech Guidelines

General purpose to inform topic selection the topics

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General Purpose: To inform. Topic Selection: The topics are concepts, all of them being types of reasoning and logical fallacies. They will be assigned in class. Research: There should be exactly three cited evidence cards prepared for this speech. Three different sources must be used, at least one of which should come from a reference work. These don’t necessarily have to be the same sources used for the Topic Research Assignment. The following online sources cannot be used for this speech: Wikipedia.org, TVTropes.org, eHow.com, About.com, and Howstuffworks.com. Social networking sites such as Facebook.com and Youtube.com, message boards, and posts made by random people on any website should also be avoided. Due to the nature of the assignment, leniency will be granted on the research that will not be granted on future assignments; however, you must still put an effort into research and the end result should reflect that. The Outline: Depending upon the topic and the amount of information available, the outline will consist of two to four main points; three main points is the ideal . Each main point must have at least two sub-points , no more than four. Keep in mind that the speech must fall within time limits, and the number of main points and sub-points on the outline will have an impact on that. This will mean adding and subtracting information as necessary. At least one main point needs to focus specifically on defining the assigned concept and explaining why it is either considered valid or invalid. Use as many examples as you can come up with, both those in the real-world and hypothetical (made up) examples.
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Other possibilities for main points include, but are not limited to: comparing the topic to other concepts that are either similar to or the opposite of the topic; discussing the origins (history) of the topic; or discussing real-life situations (either historical or contemporary) that relate to the topic. The Bibliography, both copies of it, should be printed on a separate sheet of paper from the Outline, although if you want to (and can figure out how to do it), it is acceptable to print the bibliography on the back side of the Outline. The Bibliography should be created in APA style,
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