Although these poems rhyme Dulce et Decorum Est keeps this pattern the entire

Although these poems rhyme dulce et decorum est keeps

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Although these poems rhyme, “Dulce et Decorum Est,” keeps this pattern the entire time while, “The Soldier,” changes in the last paragraph. During this time the author Rupert Brooke decided to have the first three stanzas not rhyme, but have the next 3 stanzas rhyme with their corresponding order. The next thing that I noticed was that in, “Dulce et Docorum Est,” the feeling of the poem seemed more like you were inside the action and it was happening right in front of your eyes. I get this feeling from the description the author, Wilfred Owen, gives about the fatigued people and the actions that they are performing. I mostly get this feeling though from the dialogue that the Owen gives in the middle of the poem saying, “GAS! Gas! Quick, Boys!” In, “The soldier,” I noticed that it was more layed back and seemed to describe more landscape than action. I think this really comes out in, “A body of England’s, breathing English air, Washed by the rivers, blest by the suns of home.”
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  • Spring '16
  • Axtell
  • Poetry, decorum est

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