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Ethics Paper on Hunting

Hunting isnt a vital part of our culture and society

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hunting isn’t a vital part of our culture and society, hunting is ethically wrong, and shouldn’t be practiced at all. Indeed the anti-hunting argument has decent points, yet it seems to be lacking logic to fully complete its argument. A main argument of the anti-hunter is that hunting is unethical because it is not essential to our survival anymore. The idea is that hunting was necessary when people had no other choice but to go out and hunt, yet over time man evolved and has taken to farming which has resulted in present day grocery shopping.
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Therefore since anyone can go to the store and buy food hunting has been rendered as useless and excessive. However this thinking is extremely flawed and is overlooking key facts that make even buying food from the grocery store immoral as well. While the anti- hunter is pointing fingers at hunters by saying that hunting is violating animal rights, they are completely missing that by shopping at a grocery store they are violating animal rights much more than the hunter ever will. The supposed main solution to hunting is not hunting which results in shopping at the grocery store, yet the anti-hunter forgets to mention the conditions of the animals that end up in the grocery store. What the anti- hunter has to realize before they assume that they are in full support of animal rights is that the meat that people buy from the grocery store is from animals who were abused their entire lives in the meat packaging industry. Although these animals are raised on so- called ‘farms’ these animals are crammed by the thousands into filthy, windowless sheds and confined to wire cages, gestation crates, barren dirt lots, and other cruel confinement systems, most won't even feel the sun on their backs or breathe fresh air until the day they are loaded onto trucks bound for slaughter. The giant corporations that run most factory farms have found that they can make more money by cramming animals into tiny spaces, even though many of the animals get sick and some die. In addition to the poor conditions that these tortured animals endure they also are deprived of any exercise so that any energy they have goes towards producing milk, eggs, or meat. Since these animals get no exercise they are injected with drugs that keep them alive in these conditions that also fatten the animals up. Amongst these drugs the animals are also genetically altered to grow faster, and produce more milk and eggs than any animal naturally would. These drugs make the animal incredibly heavy yet they are too weak
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from not exercising that they are crippled under their own weight and die. If the animals survive long enough to make it to a slaughterhouse most will have their throats slit, often while they are still conscious. Many remain conscious when they are plunged into the scalding-hot water of the defeathering or hair-removal tanks or while their bodies are being skinned or hacked apart. A hunted animal experiences none of the torture listed above.
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