1 circle the addition or subtraction words in each

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1. Circle the addition or subtraction words in each question. 2. Find the numbers in the chart. 3. Solve each question. Questions 1. What is the sum of the scores in the Purdue versus Xavier game? __________ 2. How many more points did Notre Dame score than Purdue in the championship game? __________ 3. What was the difference in the scores in the South West Missouri State versus Washington State? __________ 4. Altogether, how many points did Connecticut score in its two games? __________ 5. In the semifinals, what was the highest score? __________ What was the lowest Regionals Semifinals Championship Purdue (88) Xavier (78) Purdue (81) South West (104) Missouri State Washington (87) State South West (64) Missouri State Notre Dame (72) Vanderbilt (64) Notre Dame (90) Connecticut (67) Louisianna (48) Connecticut (75) Purdue (66) Notre Dame Notre Dame (68) Tech
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 181 score? __________ Subtract the lowest score from the highest score. __________ 6. Find the total number of points scored in the championship game. __________ 7. In the Notre Dame versus Connecticut game, how much bigger was the winner’s score than the loser’s score? __________ 8. Add the points scored in the Connecticut versus Louisiana Tech game. __________ 9. In all, how many points did Purdue score during the games it played? __________ 166 2 115 26 134 148 17 235 15 142 tog het reef lefudo dame logas lalb trowhs wot saw Problem numbers: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Scrambled words: _____ _____ _____, _____ _____ and ____ _____ ____ ______. Message: Ruth Riley _____ _____ _____, _____ _____ and ____ _____ ____ ______.
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 182 Third Grade–Fifth Grade Math Math in the Sports Pages: Sports Percentages Students practice solving percentage problems as they compute sports page statis- tics. National Standards: NM.K-4.12, NM.5-5.8, NM.K-4.8, NM.5-8.7, NM.K-4.4, NM.5- 8.4 Skills: Changing a percent to a decimal, changing a fraction or a decimal to a percent, finding the percentage of a number Estimated Lesson Time: 30 minutes Teacher Preparation • Duplicate the Math in the Sports Pages: Sports Percentages worksheet on pages 185-186 for each student. Collect the items listed under Materials. Collect sports pages from the newspaper for a week. • Review the meanings of the various abbreviations used in basketball by reading the background information in lesson 1, “Basketball Box Scores,” on page 168. Add extra interest by substituting statistics about local NCAA® college basketball teams for the statistics in the lesson. Materials Sports pages collected from local newspapers • 1 copy of the Math in the Sports Pages: Sports Percentages worksheet on pages 185-186 for each student 1 calculator for each student 1 pencil for each student Background Information How can we compare two players if they have played on different teams and in a different number of games? One way is to compute percentages. Percentages alone can be misleading, however. For example, two basketball players with identical field goal percentages of .667 can have very different backgrounds. One could have made 44 field goals out of 66 attempts while the other has made 8 out of 12 attempts. Since
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