There are two main criteria for the basis of an

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There are two main criteria for the basis of an argument: its premises and its conclusion. From identifying and dissecting these two things one can evaluate an argument. A premise is the basis of the argument that the person arguing uses to make a case, they basically use supported facts. The conclusion is almost like summarizing to the point the important parts of your premises; it wraps up what you want to prove. To evaluate an argument two questions must be asked: “Are its premises true and worthy of our belief?” and “Does its conclusion really follow from the premises?” Both of these questions must be answered in order to truly evaluate an argument. If an argument doesn’t make clear what its premises are while at the same time making sure that they are believable then the point is lost and the argument fails. At the same time one must be able to draw a precise conclusion that makes sense with respect to the premises; if this isn’t possible then the argument also fails. The object of an argument is to persuade someone who isn’t on your side to believing you, so both of these questions are critical to changing someone’s stance. Making someone accept your conclusion depends on how well you convey the premises; no one will believe you without some conclusive proof. This proof is the basis for the conclusion, which is the money maker. If your conclusion accurately sums truthful premises while properly capturing the other person’s attention then there’s a strong chance you will win the argument.
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What is a deductive argument? A deductive argument is one that because of the given premises the conclusion is almost without a doubt the truth. The premises are based purely on fact and from this one can conclude that conclusion is purely fact. An example of a deductive argument would be: I only have two feet, a right and a left; I have five toes on my right foot and five toes on my left foot.
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