How does the marriage market work The marriage market a model that is widely

How does the marriage market work the marriage market

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How does the marriage market work? The marriage market – a model that is widely used by social scientists – consists of individuals who are searching for a spouse in a particular geographic area, who have a set of preferences concerning the type of person they wish to find and a set of resources to offer in return. The predominant marriage bargain at mid-20 th century, based on the specialization model of marriage, involved a husband who traded his earnings in return for child care and housework by his wife. This model of marriage no longer fits the present-day marriage market. In particular, evidence suggests that both men and women now prefer partners with good earnings potential. Chapter 8 Looking Back How has married women’s work changed over the past half-century? In the second half of the 20 th century, married women entered the labor force in large numbers. A majority of married women with young children are now employed outside the home. The rise of the service sector and the long-term decline in fertility are two important reasons for women’s increase in labor force participation. In the 2000s, married women’s labor force declined slightly but remains at a high level. How does our society treat the labor of caring for others? Much of the caring labor in families was provided by wives in the home. It was not considered work because it was unpaid and consisted of caring for people. As women have moved into the paid labor force, the value of the caring they provided has become evident and has proven difficult to replace. Some authors suggest that we must place a higher value on caring labor – paid or unpaid. How has the division of labor in marriages changed? Wives have greatly reduced the amount of housework they do, while husbands have increased theirs. As a result, the relative amount of housework done by husbands and wives has become less unequal. Overall, the total amount of housework being done has declines; couples are buying more services, such as restaurant meals, than they used to. College-educated wives report higher marital quality when they work for pay, but non-college-educated wives do not. What are some of the strains working parents can experience? Working parents may suffer from overload due to their multiple roles as workers, parents, caregivers, and spouses. Difficulties at work can spill over into their home lives, leading to irritable, negative exchanges. One increasingly common way for dual-earner couples to manage child care is to work split shifts, a practice that provides children with parental care but can strain a marriage to the point of divorce. How is the workplace responding to the needs of working parents? Workers are concerned about meshing their jobs with their family responsibilities, and corporations and government are responding. Large corporations are increasingly providing assistance such as caregiving leave and flexible hours. So far, these and other reforms have benefited college-educated
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  • Fall '08
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  • Human Sexuality, partner, Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior

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