The french were now prepared to cooperate ener

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The French were now prepared to cooperate ener- getically in a brilliant stroke. Admiral de Grasse, operating with a powerful fleet in the West Indies, advised the Americans that he was free to join with them in an assault on Cornwallis at Yorktown. Quick to seize this opportunity, General Washington made a swift march of more than three hundred miles to the Chesapeake from the New York area. Accompanied by Rochambeau's French army, Washington beset the British by land, while de Grasse blockaded them by sea after beating off the British fleet. Completely cornered, Cornwallis surrendered his entire force of seven thousand men on October 19, 1781, as his band appropriately played "The World Turn'd Upside Down." The triumph was no less French than American: the French provided essentially all the sea power and about half of the regular troops in the besieging army of some sixteen thousand men. Stunned by news of the disaster, Prime Minister Lord North cried, "Oh God! It's all over! It's all over!" But it was not. George III stubbornly planned to continue the struggle, for Britain was far from being crushed. It still had fifty-four thousand troops in North America, including thirty-two thousand in the United States. Washington returned with his army to New York, there
. ' .-..,A;., ( /.,;,,,it ,..., , .(• · . '"lltf:;t~ (J .. , to continue keeping a vigilant eye on the British force of ten thousand men. Fighting actually contin ued for more than a year after Yorktown, with Patriot-Loyalist warfare in the South especially savage. "No quarter for Tories" was the common battle cry. One ofWashington's most valuable contributions was to keep the languishing cause alive, the army in the field, and the states together during these critical months. Otherwise a satisfactory peace treaty might never have been signed. Blundering George III, a poor loser, wrote this of America: "Knavery seems to be so much the striking feature of its inhabitants that it may not in the end be an evil that they become aliens to this Kingdom." tt/J•d/~ - a; Negotiating the Peace 159 Battle of the Chesapeake Capes , 1781 A y oung F rench na val officer, Pierre J oseph Jenn ot, sketched wha t is probably the o nly depiction of the epochal s ea battle by a participant. The B ritish a nd French fleets first e ngaged on September 5 and for two days chased each other while drift in g one hundred m iles south. On S eptember 8, the French turned back north w ard and occupied Chesapeake Bay, cutting off General Cornwallis, ashore in Yorktown, from su p port and escape by sea. W hen General Washington, with more French help, blocked any British retreat by land, a doomed Cornwallis surrendered. Peace at Paris After Yorktown, despite George III's obstinate eagerness to continue fighting, many Britons were weary of war and increasingly ready to come to terms. They had suffered heavy reverses in India and in the West Indies. The island of Minorca in the Mediterranean had fallen; the Rock of Gibraltar was tottering. Lord North's ministry collapsed in March 1782, temporarily ending the personal rule of George III.

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