Attempt Overall Grade highest attempt 19 3 Attempt 2 Written Sep 16

Attempt overall grade highest attempt 19 3 attempt 2

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Attempt Score: 19 / 31 Overall Grade (highest attempt) : 19 / 3 Attempt 2 Written: Sep 16, 2019 9:34 PM - Sep 16, 2019 9:42 PM Submission View Your quiz has been submitted successfully. "The images below are not interactive. You must access each website listed in order to complete this Learning Activity Module."
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1 / 1 point For Questions 1-4 use the constellation Orion (see selection menu in the far right panel-Star Controls) For a star nearly below the celestial equator (almost touching) the star's general path across the visible sky is seen by the observer as:
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a) as an east to west rising and setting motion with an arc length that is equal to that of the arc length of t b) as an east to west rising and setting motion with an arc length that is shorter to that of the arc length of c) as an east to west rising and setting motion with an arc length that is longer to that of the arc length of d) always above the horizon neither rising nor setting. Quest ion 2 1 / 1 poin t For the above observation, the true direction of the star's path across the sky was from: a) southeast to northeast b) southeast to southwest c) northeast to southeast d) northeast to northwest e) it did not rise or set-it-stayed above the horizon Quest ion 3 1 / 1 poin t For a star at the zenith (directly above the observer, altitude=90 degrees) position, the true direction of the star's path across the sky was from: a) southeast to northeast b) southeast to southwest c) northeast to southeast d) northeast to northwest
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e) it did not rise or set-it stayed above the horizon f) it appears motionless Question 4 1 / 1 point For a star at the NCP position, the true direction of the star's path across the sky was from: 1) Southeast to northeast 2) southeast to southwest 3) northeast to southeast 4) northeast to northwest 5) it appears motionless Observational Note: The star Polaris was conveniently placed within ½ degree of the North Celestial Pole (NCP). Nicknamed the North Star, Polaris is not the biggest, best or brightest star. It is the nearly motionless behavior that distinguishes it from all other stars. The NCP is the pivot point or rotational axis around which the sky is observed to turn around. The dome shaped sky above our heads and the assumed dome underneath us that the earth blocks from our view is called the celestial sphere. In addition to the compass and zenith directions other useful reference features are mentally "painted" unto the sky. By definition 90 degree away from the sky poles (NCP and SCP) would be the celestial equator. Like the equator on the earth its role is to divide the sky into a northern and southern half. The meridian is a local arc drawn through the observer's zenith and the north and south point on the horizon. It simply divides the sky into an east and west half.
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Place your cursor on the grass of the observer's backyard.
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