60 TUTOR MARKED ASSIGNMENT Discuss personal social counseling 70 REFERENCES 81

60 tutor marked assignment discuss personal social

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6.0 TUTOR MARKED ASSIGNMENT Discuss personal-social counseling? 7.0 REFERENCES
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81 Olaide, J. O. (1986) Guidance and Counselling. A functional Approach. Lagos Odebiyi Commercial Enterprise Maisamari J. Y. (2003) The New National Policy of Education and the place of Guidance and Counselling. The Counsellor. 19(2) pp90-99. UNIT 4: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Counselling is the process of assisting individuals to cope with life situations. It is defined as a person-to-person, face-to-face encounter between the counsellor and the client. It is a relationship of trust whereby the counsellor who is capable of being regarded as a special kind of teacher assists an individual to evaluate himself and his opportunities, make a feasible choice in the light of his unique characteristics and opportunities, accept responsibility for his choice and initiate a course of action that is appropriate with his choice. Guidance and counselling as a ‘helping’ profession is based on certain principles to facilitate its effectiveness. There are about ten of the principles and they relate to the practice of guidance and counselling in Nigeria. 2.0 OBJECTIVES It is hoped that by the end of this unit, you should be able to:
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82 Discuss the basic principles of guidance and counselling Explain how guidance services can recognis e client’s worth and dignity. 3.0 MAIN CONTEXT 3.1 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING 1. Guidance services are for all people. A programme of guidance services is potentially intended for all people and not only those who have problems. Students, staff, the community and other agencies may benefit directly from a programme of guidance services. Even if an individual is not experiencing educational, vocational or personal-social problems, such a person may need some help or to be motivated to plan his life more meaningfully. In a real life situation, each individual often experiences one type of problem or the other although he may not be aware of or even admit he needs help. For example, students who perform creditably in academic subjects may need motivation to be achievement-oriented. A clever boy or girl may become an under-achiever if he or she is not working to his/her full potentiality. Every student is welcome to seek guidance although some students may need it more than others. 2. Guidance services are voluntary and not by force or coercion. The students may be persuaded but not forced to participate in a counselling encounter. Shy and reluctant clients may be referred to the counsellor by their parents, teachers, friends or other significant persons, but the counselor has no right to force a client to come for counselling. 3. Guidance services are for all school levels. Appropriate types of counselling techniques should be fashioned to suit the needs of counselling at primary school, junior secondary school and post secondary institutions of our educational system. Counsellors should realize that the type of problems and concerns of the clients differ from one age to the other. But each stage of life
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