A each town had a congregational church and a school

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a. Each town had a Congregational Church and a school. b. To train an educated ministry, Harvard College was established in 1636. 2. The freemen of Massachusetts elected their governor. 3. Church government was decentralized. a. Full church membership was required to vote in colony-wide elections. b. Church and colonial government were intricately linked. G. Puritan Liberties 1. Puritans defined liberties by social rank, producing a rigid hierarchal society justified by God’s will. 2. The Body of Liberties affirmed the rights of free speech and assembly and equal protection for all. 3. Although ministers were forbidden to hold office in Massachusetts, church and state were closely interconnected.
VI. New Englanders Divided A.Roger Williams 1. A young Puritan minister, Williams preached that any citizen ought to be free to practice whatever form of religion he chose. 2. Williams believed that it was essential to separate church and state. B. Rhode Island and Connecticut 1. Williams was banished from Massachusetts in 1636 and he established Rhode Island.2. Rhode Island was truly a beacon of religious freedom and democratic government. 3. Other spin-offs from Massachusetts included New Haven and Hartford, which joined to become the colony of Connecticut in 1662.
C. The Trials of Anne Hutchinson 1. Hutchinson was a well-educated, articulate woman who charged that nearly all the ministers in Massachusetts were guilty of faulty preaching. 2. Hutchinson was placed on trial in 1637 for sedition. a. On trial she spoke of divine revelations. b. She and her followers were banished. 3. As seen with Williams and Hutchinson, Puritan New England was a place of religious persecution. a. Quakers were hanged in Massachusetts. b. Religious tolerance violated “moral liberty.”
The Pequot War became to be an armed conflict that took place between 1636 and 1638 in New England between the Pequot tribe and an alliance of the English colonists of the Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Saybrook colonies and their Native American allies.The war concluded with the decisive defeat of the Pequot. At the end, about seven hundred Pequots had been killed or taken into captivity. Hundreds of prisoners were sold into slavery to the West Indies; other survivors were dispersed as captives to the victorious tribes.
D. Puritans and Indians 1. Colonial leaders had differing opinions about the English right to claim Indian land. 2. To New England’s leaders, the Indians represented both savagery and temptation. a. The Connecticut General Court set a penalty for anyone who chose to live with the Indians. b. No real attempt to convert the Indians was made by the Puritans in the first two decades. The Puritans believed that they had been enlightened by God and had been shown the correct way to follow him. When they encountered the Natives of the New World, they saw them as an idolatrous race that needed to be shown the “One True Faith” that the Puritans subscribed to.

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