Decision the ninth circuit us court of appeals ruled

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Decision: The Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that the dress code is not subject to the Tinker standard because the school in Tinker singled out certain viewpoints. The Clark County school regulation was not aimed at any particular student‘s message; it applied to everyone regardless of what message they wanted to deliver, so it was constitutional. (Jacobs v. Clark County School District)
4-Internet Speech (Two cases) Facts: A high school student creates a website which criticizes his band teacher. When school officials see the site, they suspend him for violating the Student Handbook. The Handbook states ―students shall not physically assault, vandalize, damage, or attempt to damage the property of a school employee or his/her family or demonstrate physical, written, or verbal disrespect/threat. Decision: The district court ruled that the school policy violated the student‘s constitutional rights because school officials do not have the authority to regulate speech made by students off campus grounds and unrelated to school activities. (O’Brien v. Westlake City Schools Board of Education) 5-Internet Speech (Two cases) Facts: A middle school student is suspended and then expelled after he publishes a website from his personal computer. The website contained vulgar and derogatory information about several teachers, including statements like, ―Why should she [his algebra teacher] die? . . . Take a look at the diagram and reasons I give, then give me $20 dollars to help pay for the hitman. Decision: The Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania rejected the student‘s First Amendment claim. It found that the student‘s website―materially disrupted the learning environment because students were discussing the site at school, and the teacher was affected when she had to take medical leave as a result of the site. (J.S. v. Bethlehem Area School District) 6-Offensive Speech Facts: A high school student delivers a nominating speech for a student government election at a school-wide assembly. The speech contains vulgar language and sexual innuendo. The student is suspended under a school policy that prohibits―obscene, profane language. Decision: The Supreme Court held that school officials may prohibit vulgar, lewd, or offensive student speech at a school function because public school officials have a responsibility to foster values in students. The speech was not protected under the First Amendment because it was not purely political speech as in Tinker. (Bethel School District v. Fraser) 7-School Newspapers Facts: High school students produce a school newspaper in their journalism class. One issue includes articles about teen pregnancy and the impact of divorce on kids. The principal says the stories are inappropriate and invade the privacy of other students, and he deletes them from the publication. The students sue, claiming their First Amendment rights were violated.

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