Low Volume Phases for cell messengers that function on longer timescales such

Low volume phases for cell messengers that function

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• Low-Volume Phases for cell messengers that function on longer timescales, such as testosterone and cortisol • Active Rest Phases for healing of connective tissues such as fascia, tendon, ligament, and bone, and possibly some psychological fatigue factors as well Details of these practices will be presented in a later section on the proper application of the fatigue management principle. POWERLIFTING DEFINITION In powerlifting terms, the principle of Fatigue Management states that while we train hard and overload to accrue adaptations, those very beneficial adaptations that make us fit also fatigue us. In the short term and at low levels, fatigue is just a part of the training process, and is quite unavoidable as it comes as a package deal with the fitness gains of overloading in training. But if fatigue rises to high levels, it interferes
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Chapter No. 5 Scientific Principles of Strength Training P 116 with performance, adaptation, and tissue integrity, none of which are conducive to best training outcomes. Thus, fatigue should be allowed to rise with normal hard training, but periodically be brought down by easier training to sustainable and non-interfering levels, so that hard training can commence once again and promote another round of beneficial adaptations to enhance size, strength, and overall powerlifting performance. Various levels of cumulative fatigue correspond with physiological states that, lucky for us, have distinct names and convenient definitions. At any point in the training process, a lifter is carrying only one of these 3 levels/categories of fatigue severity: A.) NORMAL TRAINING AT OR BELOW MRV If you’re doing anything between not training at all (and like most normal everyday people, carrying almost no cumulative fatigue) and training right up to your MRV, then you can be classified as being in “adequate recovery.” Your fatigue is low enough that it’s not interfering with either adaptation or performance, and your injury risk is not elevated. There is almost no need to fatigue manage in this state, as it’s full-steam ahead! B.) OVERREACHING (FUNCTIONAL & NON-FUNCTIONAL) Overreaching results from training for some time between points c and d from our discussion on MRV in the Overload chapter. This can be done both accidentally and on purpose. If the way you got to passing your MRV is by not recovering enough (for example, you’re not getting enough sleep this week), then your fatigue begins to rise to levels that present a problem. This is termed “non-functional overreaching,” since your training stimulus did not increase to make it happen, but your
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Chapter No. 5 Scientific Principles of Strength Training P 117 recovery just went down. Thus, this type of overreaching comes without the benefits of increased adaptations, because it’s the hard training that gets you adaptations, not a lack of recovery. If it was actually the fatigue and not the hard training that increased it that lead to gains, we could all just break up with our significant others while taking on double shifts at work and gains would explode!
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  • Spring '18
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