5 13 No An activity based approach should be adopted only if its expected

5 13 no an activity based approach should be adopted

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5-13 No. An activity-based approach should be adopted only if its expected benefits exceed its expected costs. It is not always a wise investment. If the jobs, products or services are alike in the way they consume indirect costs of a company, then a simple costing system will suffice. 5-2
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5-14 Increasing the number of indirect-cost pools does NOT guarantee increased accuracy of product or service costs. If the existing cost pool is already homogeneous, increasing the number of cost pools will not increase accuracy. If the existing cost pool is not homogeneous, accuracy will increase only if the increased cost pools themselves increase in homogeneity vis-a-vis the single cost pool. 5-15 The controller faces a difficult challenge. The benefits of a better accounting system show up in improved decisions by managers. It is important that the controller have the support of these managers when seeking increased investments in accounting systems. Statements by these managers showing how their decisions will be improved by a better accounting system are the controller’s best arguments when seeking increased funding. For example, the new system will result in more accurate product costs which will influence pricing and product mix decisions. The new system can also be used to reduce product costs which will lower selling prices. As a result, the customer will benefit from the new system. 5-16 (20 min.) Cost hierarchy. 1. a. Indirect manufacturing labor costs of $1,200,000 support direct manufacturing labor and are output unit-level costs. Direct manufacturing labor generally increases with output units, and so will the indirect costs to support it. b. Batch-level costs are costs of activities that are related to a group of units of a product rather than each individual unit of a product. Purchase order-related costs (including costs of receiving materials and paying suppliers) of $600,000 relate to a group of units of product and are batch-level costs. c. Cost of indirect materials of $350,000 generally changes with labor hours or machine hours which are unit-level costs. Therefore, indirect material costs are output unit- level costs. d. Setup costs of $700,000 are batch-level costs because they relate to a group of units of product produced after the machines are set up. e. Costs of designing processes, drawing process charts, and making engineering changes for individual products, $900,000, are product-sustaining because they relate to the costs of activities undertaken to support individual products regardless of the number of units or batches in which the product is produced. f. Machine-related overhead costs (depreciation and maintenance) of $1,200,000 are output unit-level costs because they change with the number of units produced. g. Plant management, plant rent, and insurance costs of $950,000 are facility-sustaining costs because the costs of these activities cannot be traced to individual products or services but support the organization as a whole.
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