Explain the pro slavery and abolitionist arguments of the antebellum period The

Explain the pro slavery and abolitionist arguments of

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 7 pages.

1. Explain the pro-slavery and abolitionist arguments of the antebellum period.
abandon the slave industry. In 1858, James Hammond told the U.S. Senate “No power on earth dares…to make war on cotton.” (Norton,2015)Slave owners justified the owning of slaves in other ways then just the financial benefits. On of North Carolina’s largest slaveholder, Paul Carrington Cameron saw himself as benevolent guardian to a so called “inferior race” that felt obligated to look over as their master. Many of theslaves learned to encourage these opinions so they would be treated better and left alone. (Norton, 2015) The pro-slavery people argued the immediate end of slavery would kill the economy in south and cause wide spread unemployment. [27f18] The southern leadership arguedit would lead to mass civil unrest and crime. They even used the Bible by pointing out Abraham had slave and Paul had returned a runaway slave. Pro-slavery individuals also cited history claiming slavery was natural as both the Greeks and Romans had slaves. Slave owners even used the U.S. Constitution by stating slaves were had no legal standing and were property, and the Constitution protected ones right to property. In general, the northern states did not support the slavery industry, to which had never been a large part of norther society. From the start of the nation there had always been some whoopposed slavery and wanted it abolished. Many felt it was hypocritical to fight the tyranny of England and then turn around and keep then industry of slavery. The movement gained momentum during the 1830s by individuals who spoke out against slavery. By 1804 the abolitionist movement had almost eliminated all slavery in the northern states. [Abo18] The abolitionist movement was built by individuals who stood up to the practice in many different ways. In 1831, William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the Liberator, an American abolitionist publication which advocated for freeing black Americans by writing of the horrors they endured. In 1833 sixty delegates formed the American Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia to denounce slavery as a mortal sin. They advocated for the immediate abolishment of slavery via nonviolent ways and condemned prejudice. [Abo18] The abolitionist movement thou was not

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture