1 2 3 prevent the creation of the hazard in the first

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1. 2. 3. Prevent the creation of the hazard in the first place. This is the most basic mitigation strategy and is carried out through a community’s ordinances and codes : fire and life safety; building; electrical; plumbing; and so forth. The requirement that all public buildings have sprinkler systems is a mitigation technique against fires. The inspection of new buildings to make sure the construction conforms to sound engineering standards is a basic way of mitigating and preventing unsafe construction. Change the nature or the size of the hazard. Suppose that the federal dam safety inspection program detected a crack in a dam or some other sign of instability. The water behind the dam could be lowered gradually and safely. This would have two results : relieving the pressure on the dam until repaired, and not endangering the environment below the dam. Stabilizing a potential landslide is another example. These examples illustrate change affecting the nature of the hazard. Here are two examples regarding size. A reduced speed limit in a school zone lessens the possibility of a child being struck by a car. If a manufacturing plant uses hazardous chemicals, there may be a legal limit on the amount stored at any one time. The manufacturer would have to observe this limit. Separate the hazard from that which it might affect. There are several ways to do this. One is to restrict such things as the hazardous use of chemicals to specific areas within a community. For example, only areas zoned for particular industrial use are permitted to use hazardous chemicals. Another way is to surround the hazard by some type of containment, such as storing hazardous materials in safe, fire-proof buildings. The Emergency Manager 3-17
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Unit Three: Mitigation 4. 5. Modify the basic characteristics of a hazard. Dangerous chemicals are often packaged with a neutralizing agent right next to the chemicals. If the chemical container sustains damage, the neutralizing agent is automatically released, thus minimizing the toxic effects of the spilled chemical. In another case, a distinctive smell added to the odorless liquid propane gas warns people that propane is present. Research what others are doing. Industry and the federal government put money into research to develop ways of making materials (like building materials) and products (like automobiles) safer. While you may not have the funds to engage in research yourself, there is no reason today that you cannot find out what others are discovering by using the resources available through the Internet and printed publications. Don’t forget to talk to other emergency managers about their mitigation efforts. They are a good source of free, valuable advice. Conclusion Your role in mitigation will vary depending on the hazards you face and your specific responsibilities and those of other government departments and agencies.
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  • Spring '10
  • None
  • mitigation, emergency manager

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