Identity theft is the use of someones personal

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Identity theft is the use of someone’s personal information to perform an unauthorized action. Identity theft can occur when sensitive information such as credit card information of personal identifiable information, such as name and social security numbers are compromised. Hackers steal information such as credit cards and banking information through many methods
Incident Response 6 such as social engineering techniques, ransom ware and targeted phishing attacks. SOTI can be used to filter suspicious phone calls, and emails using a firewall. Employees will also need to be educated on the different techniques used by hackers to steal their information. The employee’s device’s Media Access Control (MAC) could have been spoofed to make it looked like his device performed malicious actions. MAC spoofing is taking the identity of another computer, and can be done for both malicious and benign reasons. The device could now perform suspicious activity and it will look like it is coming from the employee’s device. An automated method will be used to protect against spoofing attacks. Because routers or switches can know which IP addresses originate with which network interface, it is possible for them to identify packets that should not have been received by a specific interface. Active methods can also be used which means that the host must perform some network action to verify that he packet was sent from the claimed source. In order to protect the device and detect attacks, the devices will have to be monitored very closely. By signing the policy and joining the company network, employees are giving use permission to be track and monitor usage for suspicious activity. To avoid privacy issues, no personal information will be taken off the device. As mentioned in the above policy, only Android devices running on version 7 and above, iPhone 6 and above and PCs are currently whitelisted. If an employee wants to add a device not on the whitelist, it will have to go through tests to determine if it can meet the security requirements. Before starting the investigation, the device will be disallowed from accessing the company network, and password protected to avoid further damage.
Incident Response 7 Continuous Improvement Plan In order to continue protecting the network and employees, we must continue improving and using the best technology. In order to protect information transmitted over 802.11 wireless networks and add a level of wireless security, and encryption called Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) was created. It was designed to prevent unauthorized access to wireless network, and prevent tampering with transmitted messages (Wong, 2003). WEP uses an RC4 stream cipher by combining a 40-bit key with a 24-bit initialization vector. Some of the issues with WEP include using the same initialization vectors, poor key management, and no authentication through the access points. In 1998, Lucent created a 128-bit key to enhance security. But this failed to address the issue when WEP keys were decrypted. Since there were some persistent security

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