Final project part iii troy mather page 4 of 10 now

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Final Project Part III | Troy MatherPage 4 of 10
Now, that I determined how I am going to pay for my advanced education, the decision now is, do I accept a position with the company as a financial manager or put all of my time and efforts into schooling? According to Forbes, if you can afford to attend one of the top 50 MBA business schools in the country, you can expect to see a 50-60 percent increase in full-time earning potential (Yeaple 2016). If you are one who works part-time, then you can hope to see a pay increase of 41 percent (Yeaple 2016). As you can see from the graph above , the salary increases in obtaining my MBA is 68 percent. However, the closest top 50 MBA program to my residence is the University of Washington Foster School of Business. Should I decided to attend I can expect the following:1.5-year MBA gain- 44.6 K2.Years to pay back- 4.13.Pre-MBA Salary- 51K4.2014 Salary Avg- 135K5.Tuition- 92,163 K (WB3, BS, L15)Source-Final Project Part III | Troy MatherPage 5 of 10
As good as this may seem, there is another consideration I need to consider and that is time. If I go full-time, I can complete the program in two years, if I work full-time and go to school part-time, then the program will take three years to complete. I think all things considered I would accept the position to work full time and seek a non-top 50 online MBA program like Portland State University at a tuition cost of $47,725 (WB3, BS, I25). I can utilize the $44,438 (WB3, BS, L23) in savings between what I would have spent on my MBA at University of Washington and allow this savings to continue to mature within the savings bonds.In the job offer, I was given a choice take a $5,000 bonus or receive 100 shares of company stock at a public offering of $50.00 per share. If I take the $5,000 cash and invest it in an account paying 5 percent interest compounded annually for ten years my future value of the investment will be 8,144.47 (WB3, BS, I35). Now, if I took the 100 shares at $50.00, I would need the price of the stock to increase in value to about $82.00 per share within a ten year period to achieve the same amount of return on my cash investment. While this is possible, I would feel more confident in my return on investment at 5 percent than I would be hoping for a stock price jump of $32 per share. If we took a company like Microsoft and industry leader in the Windows operating system for home and business, their stock price in November 2011 was $25.58, and as of October 2016, the company’s stock price has risen to $57.64 per share. While this increase does meet my $32 per share growth need and a 44.37 percent return on investment, the company I am considering the job offer from is not registered as required by the Securities Act of 1933. By not being registered I do not see how the stock offering will be of benefit to my investment needs.

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