Seated therefore it allowed the assembly of

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seated. Therefore, it allowed the assembly of individuals Within the agora, marketing was carried on and most cities had officials known as "agoranomoi" who were entrusted to ensure fairness and to exercise control. Walls represented grandness and beauty. They were used as an ornament added after the city was laid out (Sparta) Shrines and Temples - main religious institutions were located within the agora distinguished one from the other - a shrine , the important characteristics were: To make a shrine, a piece of land was acquired and an object was placed and dedicated to a deity A boundary was established in order to preserve the place be located almost everywhere within the city. If an image of a deity was set up, than a temple as built. Temples played a very important role within Greek City: Temples usually had an east to west orientation The main front of a temple usually faced east A temple was the house of a god and its purpose was not to house the worshippers. Stoa - an all-purpose building found in the agora. be attributed to its colonnade which could be used for social meetings, political and commercial functions as well as a headquarters for the Magistrates. Gymnasium A Greek city would be incomplete without a gymnasium. The various attributes commonly associated with it are: A gymnasium was attached to a local deity or a hero The location of a gymnasium was guided by the presence of a natural spring. Stadium - integral part of the Greek city. find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com
Level land which was 200 yards long. Due to the extent of land required, they were located in the outskirts of a city A convenient slope was sought after for the benefit of the spectators. Theatre - a major contribution of the Greek civilization. A flat surface and slopes rising from that surface Due to the mountainous terrain, the foothills provided an ideal location associated with the Acropolis. AREAS OF GREEK COLONIZATION AND COLONIAL CITIES along the Black Sea coast (in the east) and the Mediterranean Sea (in the west). "apoika" which means emigration or "away home". The colonies were independent of the mother country. The migration and establishment of planted cities took place in two phases: The first wave of movement - Italy and Sicily and thereafter to southern France, Libya and Spain. The second wave of migration was toward the east along the Black Sea coast. Colonial Cities The emergence of urban planning can be traced by examining Greek colonial cities. The major features of the planned colonial cities are as follows: The streets crossed each other at right angles; The streets were laid out first and then lots were assigned to settlers. There was uniformity of size; no Acropolis as the walls provided protection from the enemy; Walls were, however, highly irregular; City space was first divided by north-south streets and this led to formation of strips; further subdivision of the land by east-west oriented streets;

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