Gander and Gardner 1984 as cited by Mathatha Viola 2013 conducted a study on

Gander and gardner 1984 as cited by mathatha viola

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Gander and Gardner (1984) as cited by Mathatha Viola, (2013) conducted a study on the effect of parental aspirations and expectations on career development and career choices in both disabled and non-disabled young people. The study found that youngsters frequently interacted with their parents as they approached adolescence. In turn, parents influenced them through indications that they were expected to take over the family business or follow the parents’ profession hence, career development. Similarly, Turner et al. (2003) found that parents had various intentions regarding the career development of their children. It is for this reason that parental involvement in guidance and counselling programmes is very important for the development of the child.
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In a longitudinal study conducted by Whiston and Keller (2004) on the parental involvement as a determinant of career development of young adolescents with visual impairments in the United States of America, it was found that parental involvement influenced what the child learnt about work and work experiences. The study also reflected parental attitudes about school and work which in turn, had a long term impact on their children’s’ career choices, decisions and plans. Ferry (2006) conducted a study on parental influence on careers of learners with visual impairments in the rural Pennsylvania. Findings indicated that parents frequently interacted with their children, by so doing, and as the school leaving age drew nearer, the aspirations of their children tended to move closer to the occupation level of their parent seven though earlier they were closer to the occupational goals common in their schools. This resulted in career development. Patton and McCrindle (2001) also conducted a longitudinal study in Queensland, Australia on how the family influenced career development of learners with disabilities. The study found that as parents engaged in quality interactions or discussions with their children, they influenced their children’s career development through indications that being adults, they knew what was better for their children. Additionally, as children engaged in quality interactions with their parents, their self esteem and ability to make decisions increased. Similarly, Sebald (1989) reported that as parents interacted with their children, they strongly influenced them in their career development through the career advice they gave them. Consequently, they developed career decision making skills. Mutie and Ndambuki (1999), reported that many students come from families which are not able to provide for their needs adequately. There is also a gap in the range of sympathetic adults who could be turned to in times of need. This gap was formally filled by adult brothers and sisters, friendly aunts and grandparents, within the traditional set-up. Families are also not equipped to provide job-related information. Such information can come from agencies whose job it is to supply relevant and adequate materials. The family is also not equipped to supply information on
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