The first passenger airplanes appeared in the 1920s

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The first passenger airplanes appeared in the 1920s, and though they were more uncomfortable than trains, the thrill excited many Americans.
1920s advertising: “Doctors recommend Lucky Cigarettes”
How did the growth of the auto industry affect American lifestyles? The auto gave people new freedoms and opportunities. The automobile allowed people to live further away from their work. This led to the growth of suburbs. People could also travel much more. The travel industry also grew because the car allowed people to make quick trips by car.
Car’s impact The auto also allowed young adults (and teens) the freedom to get away from their parents. Not surprising, there was an increase in out-of- wedlock pregnancies.
The automobile and radio How did new industries such as the automobile and radio change the people lived? The automobile offered more mobility so people could live farther from their job. Radio connected people to entertainment and news , and increased exposure to advertising. The radio also helped create a national culture because people were all listening to and talking about the same things.
Selling Cars in the 1920s through advertising
New Ways To Pay In the early 1900s, most Americans paid for items in full when they bought them, perhaps borrowing money for very large, important, or expensive items like houses, pianos, or sewing machines. Borrowing was not considered respectable until the 1920s, when installment buying , or paying for an item over time in small payments, became popular. They bought on credit , which is, in effect, borrowing money. Consumers quickly took to installment buying to purchase new products on the market. By the end of the decade, 90 percent of durable goods, or long- lasting goods like cars and appliances, were bought on credit. Advertisers encouraged the use of credit, telling consumers they could “get what they want now” and assuring them that with small payments they would “barely miss the money.”
Natural Disasters • Boll weevil infestations ruined cotton crops. • The Mississippi River flooded in 1927, killing thousands and leaving many homeless. • “The Big Blow,” the strongest hurricane recorded up to that time, killed 243 people in Florida. Weaknesses in the Economy Land Speculation In Florida, the wild land boom came to a sudden and disastrous end. Florida sank into an economic depression even as other parts of the nation enjoyed prosperity. • Though the “Roaring Twenties” brought prosperity to many, other Americans suffered deeply in the postwar period Farmers American farmers who had good times during World War I found demand slowed, and competition from Europe reemerged. The government tried to help in 1921 by passing a tariff making foreign farm products more expensive, but it didn’t help much.
The Main Idea The nation’s desire for normalcy and its support for American business was reflected in two successive presidents it chose–Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge.

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