The constancy of mass in chemical reactions was observed so often that

The constancy of mass in chemical reactions was

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The constancy of mass in chemical reactions was observed so often that scientists assumed the phenomenon must be true for all reactions.
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Conservation of Mass Click box to view movie clip.
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Conservation of Mass They summarized this observation in a scientific law. The law of conservation of mass states that mass is neither created nor destroyed during a chemical reaction—it is conserved.
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Conservation of Mass The equation form of the law of conservation of mass is:
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Basic Assessment Questions Basic Assessment Questions A reaction between sodium hydroxide and hydrogen chloride gas produces sodium chloride and water. A reaction of 22.85 g of sodium hydroxide with 20.82 g of hydrogen chloride gives off 10.29 g of water. What mass of sodium chloride is formed in the reaction? Question
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Basic Assessment Questions Basic Assessment Questions 33.38 g sodium chloride Answer
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Section 3.2 Assessment When one substances turns into another, what kind of change has taken place? A. chemical reaction B. physical reaction C. extensive reaction D. nuclear reaction
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Section 3.2 Assessment When one substances turns into another, what kind of change has taken place? A. chemical reaction B. physical reaction C. extensive reaction D. nuclear reaction
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Section 3.2 Assessment The law of conservation of mass states that: A. Matter can be created and destroyed. B. Matter can be created but not destroyed. C. The products of a reaction always have a greater mass than the reactants. D. The products of a reaction must have the same mass as the
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Section 3.2 Assessment The law of conservation of mass states that: A. Matter can be created and destroyed. B. Matter can be created but not destroyed. C. The products of a reaction always have a greater mass than the reactants. D. The products of a reaction must have the same mass as the
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Section 3.3 Mixtures of Matter A mixture is a combination of two or more pure substances in which each pure substance retains its individual chemical properties. The composition of mixtures is variable, and the number of mixtures that can be created by combining substances is infinite. Based on the distribution of the components mixtures can be classified as…….
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A homogenous mixture is a mixture where the composition is constant throughout. Homogeneous mixtures are also called solutions . A heterogeneous mixture is a mixture where the individual substances remain distinct.
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Mixtures HOMOGENEOUS HETEROGENEOUS The composition Is uniform Composition is not uniform Also called solution One phase More than one phase
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Mixtures Phase –describe any part of a sample with uniform composition Two mixtures, sand and water, and table salt and water, are shown. You know water to be a colorless liquid .
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  • Summer '16
  • Chemistry, Chemical Properties And Change, Chemical substance, Chemical compound

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