Using plants that are similar in size can help to

Info icon This preview shows pages 7–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Using plants that are similar in size can help to achieve rhythm through repetition of size. Proportion in hardscape Features are most functional for people when they fit the human body. Benches, tables, pathways, arbors, and gazebos work best when people can use them easily and feel comfortable using them (Figure 11). The hardscape should also be proportional to the house—a deck or patio should be large enough for entertaining but not so large that it doesn’t fit the scale of the house. F I G U R E 1 1 . Proportion in plants and hardscape Proportions in voids Human scale is also important for psychological comfort in voids or open spaces. People feel more secure in smaller open areas, such as patios and terraces. An important concept of spatial comfort is enclosure. Most people feel at ease with some sort of overhead condition (Figure 11) that implies a ceiling. The enclosure does not have to be solid; in fact, an implied enclosure, such as tree branches, serves as a good psychological enclosure that still allows light and views of the sky. Order Order generally refers to the spatial layout or organization of the design and is most often achieved through balance. Balance is the concept of equal visual attraction and weight, usually around a real or imaginary central axis. Form, color, size, and texture all affect balance. Balance can be symmetrical, asymmetrical, or perspective. Order can also be achieved by massing features or elements into distinct groups and arranging them around a central point. Symmetrical balance Symmetrical balance is achieved when the same objects (mirror images) are placed on either side of an axis. Figure 12 shows the same trees, plants, and structures on both sides of the axis. This type of balance is used in formal designs and is one of the oldest and most desired spatial organization concepts. This is because the mind naturally divides space by assuming a central axis and then seeks an even distribution of objects or mass (visual weight). Many historic gardens are organized using this concept.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
8 F I G U R E 1 2 . Symmetrical balance around an axis Asymmetrical balance Asymmetrical balance is achieved by equal visual weight of nonequivalent forms, color, or texture on either side of an axis. This type of balance is informal and is usually achieved by masses of plants that appear to be the same in visual weight rather than total mass. Figure 13 shows groupings of trees and structures that are approximately equal in visual weight on either side of the axis. The mass can be achieved by combinations of plants, structures, and garden ornaments. To create balance, features with large sizes, dense forms, bright colors, and coarse textures appear heavier and should be used sparingly, while small sizes, sparse forms, gray or subdued colors, and fine texture appear lighter and should be used in greater amounts.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern