Set the pace of the pacific war from the beginning

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Set the pace of the pacific war from the beginning Escaped emotional scars that WWI inflicted on Britain Legacy of WWI -> WWII Drive for autonomy and independence Felt like jr. ally in WWI US Constitution was prime force in shaping American strategic culture 1920-1945 FDR became a benign dictator in time of war Was commander in chief, head of state, and head of gov Judicial and legislative branches did not intervene in the making os strategy Didn’t give congress much more info than newspapers Didn’t not consult about strategy War Power’s Act Allows president during state of war to rearrange gov as he sees fit FDR created new agencies such as War Production Board that reported directly to him rather than to cabinet departments During interwar years congressed passed legislation to try to keep America neutral Strategy of innocence Isolated by the oceans and cocooned in a political system devoted to preservation of liberty rather than exercise of state power In time of war saw as crusade and wanted unconditional surrender
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The strategy of innocence? The United States, 1920-1945 By  Eliot A. Cohen 17:53 Only saw other nations as friends or foes Didn’t forsee the necessity of balancing society encroachments in Europe until too late 1920s some americans argued that the preservation of the European balance of power was now a national interest American colonies in the pacific as an extension of nation interests; naval planning, need to defend those colonies Fight for democracy as a princinple Saw no immediate threat; armed forces were a form of security After 1930s main naval enemy was Japan Unlike their army counterparts believed that in case of war the nacy should mount a serious effort to rescue or recover the Philippines Knew that up coming war long and victory wouldn’t be through one battle but through a series of campaign Army never defined an enemy in the interwar period Forces designed for the western hemisphere When war came army adjusted slowly Until 1942 US stood on strategic defense to protect itself against direct attacks American strategic decision makers faced two critical problems How to build a domestic consensus to support intervention on the allied side Less serious than decision makers thought How to expand the US military forces while sustaining the allies and keeping sufficient forces ready to deter enemy aggression Series of painful tradeoffs 50 american destroyers for british bases in the western hemisphere shipment of “surplus” army equipment
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The strategy of innocence? The United States, 1920-1945 By  Eliot A. Cohen 17:53 presidential decisions to force the series to surrender to countries on the verge of collapse In order to avoid defeat US had to sustain its allies on a vast scale, in order to win, it had to embark on the most extensive strategic offensives in history Americans confronted the challenge of two continent sixed citadels Would not suffice to blockade the enemy and reduce him Had to penetrate into the enemy heartlands
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