The 2003 cfsr rated item 42 a strength since that

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The 2003 CFSR rated Item 42 a strength. Since that time the program has been further strengthened by: Consultation and training by Don Schmid, a Title IV-E subject matter expert For residential programs other then foster homes, consolidation of Behavioral Health and Human Services Licensing into a single Division of Licensing and Regulatory Services to integrate regulatory processes and improve efficiency. Administrative transfer of IV-E Eligibility Specialists to the Child Welfare Services Division, in order to improve training, supervision, and accountability. Current practice – what does the data show? Since the 2003 CFSR, Maine successfully passed IV-E reviews in 2004 and again in 2007. The 2007 IV-E review found Maine to be in substantial compliance with the Federal IV-E Federal Foster Care Program eligibility requirements. The review findings noted that: “Since the previous IV-E foster care review in May 2004, Maine has strengthened its procedures for determination and documenting financial need and deprivation of parental support, according to the State’s July 16, 1996 guidelines for AFDC.” With the 2004 implementation of a revised case review instrument based on the CFSR case review process, PQI case record reviews discontinued checking for compliance with licensing. This item continues to be a strength for Maine as noted in the proceeding section. Key collaborators: The DHHS Division of Licensing and Regulatory Services – for institutional licensing practice (foster home licensing continues to be done by DHHS Child Welfare Services Division staff) Maine District Court. According to the 2007 IV-E Review, “All cases reviewed were found to have required judicial determination of ‘contributing to the welfare of the child,’ ‘to remain in the home,’ ‘reasonable efforts to prevent placement,’ and ‘reasonable efforts to finalize the permanency plan.’” The State Fire Marshal’s Office for fire safety inspections of licensed homes and residential care facilities. Federal Bureau of Identification, for criminal background checks The State Bureau of Identification and Local Law Enforcement, for the fingerprinting necessary for criminal background checks Maine CFSR Statewide Assessment 223 March 2009
What are the influences, resources, issues and barriers that affect overall performance of the Maine Child Welfare System? Since eligibility is now determined by a unit that is centrally supervised by a child welfare manager, the potential for district-specific issues has been minimized and none are currently identified. A barrier faced by Maine is that many kinship placements are not licensed, although there is equal application of standards for IV-E eligible placements. Management requirements for caseworkers to place children with relatives have been emphasized more than management oversight to maximize the licensing of kinship placements. Although licensing homestudies are

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