Strategic Leadership Transition.pdf

Kristi mellon elementary principal dr mike wilhoit

Info icon This preview shows pages 7–14. Sign up to view the full content.

Mrs. Kristi Mellon, Elementary Principal Dr. Mike Wilhoit, Elementary Principal Mrs. Shelby Scarbrough, Middle School Principal Dr. Angela Rolofson, Director of Student Services Dr. Jerrod Wheeler, Superintendent of Schools
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

First Things First: Define The Type of Leadership Transition Leaders in transition often reflexively rely on past skills, strategies, and successes that have worked for them in the past. Often times, that is a mistake. Rather, leaders in transition must quickly gain a deep understanding of the organization, its needs, and its current reality. Leaders must then adapt their leadership style to the situation at hand in order to experience success. A successful transition plan identifies up front the type of transition which is occurring. The best plans often begin by aligning the leader selection specifically to the type of transition desired.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Essential Components for Successful Leadership Transitioning Provide Critical Information Specific to the District Define Responsibilities Set Goals Discuss and Implement Action Steps Provide Professional Development and Training Opportunities Evaluate Outcomes
Image of page 10
Provide Critical Information Contract: Financial terms, specific language, written and verbal alignment Calendar: days, months, holidays, snow days Insurance: plans, options, considerations Comprehensive School Improvement Plan: Who, What, When, Where, Why Building/Dept. Budget: trends, recurring expenditures, revolving expenditures Legal Issues: personnel, students, parents, hot spots Personnel Issues: Performance Improvement Plans, political considerations
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Define Responsibilities Implementing CSIP Goals: what’s in the wheelhouse, what’s not Collecting Information/Data: Core Data, assessments, Building Improvement Plan Conducting Certified and Classified Evaluations: instrument, plan, training Attending Meetings: which ones, how often, community engagement Communicating with other Administrators: methods, meetings, expectations Communicating with Stakeholders: what is shared, how, how often Creating Expectations: what areas, how aggressive, what
Image of page 12
Set Goals
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern