31 dieter kuhn science and civilisation in china vol

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31 Dieter Kuhn, Science and Civilisation in China; Vol. 5. Chemistry and Chemical Technology. Part IX. Textile Technology: Spinning and Reeling (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), p. 223. 32 Huang, Peasant Family , p. 46. 33 E. A. Wrigley, Continuity, Chance and Change: The Character of the Industrial Revolution in England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988). 34 See for instance Allen, The British Industrial Revolution. 35 David A. Washbrook, “Progress and Problems: South Asian Economic and Social History, c. 1720- 1860,” Modern Asian Studies 22/1 (1988), pp. 57-96. In a very different vein, this point is also made by Michael Adas, Machines as the Measure of Men: Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1989). 36 Vijaya Ramaswami, “The Genesis and Historical Role of the Masterweavers in South Indian Textile Production,” JESHO 28 (1985), p. 300; Washbrook, “Progress and Problems,” p. 60 and 78. 37 Réflexions des marchands merciers, drapiers, et corps unis de la ville de Rouen, sur l'impossibilité de fabriquer en France des toiles propres pour l'impression, en concurrence avec celles des Indes (Rouen ?, [c. 1756]), p. 3. 38 Réflexions , p. 2. Bleaching accounted for the remainder 4%. For India see: Ian Christopher Wendt, “The Social Fabric: Textile Industry and Community in Early Modern South India” (Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005), pp. 336-37 39 Réflexions , p. 4. 40 TNA, CO 388/21, part 1 f. 206 (1721). 41 Robert Allen, and Stephen Broadberry & Bishnu Gupta support the view of high wages in Europe: Robert C. Allen, “The Great Divergence in European Wages and Prices from the Middle Ages to the First World War,” Explorations in Economic History 38 (2001), pp. 411-47; Id., “Britain’s Economic Ascendancy in a European Context,” in Leandro Prados de la Escosura, ed., Exceptionalism and Industrialisation: Britain and Its European Rivals, 1688-1815 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 15-34; Id., British Industrial Revolution , esp. ch. 6. Broadberry & Gupta consider factor prices more widely: Stephen Broadberry and Bishnupriya Gupta, “The Early Modern Great Divergence: Wages, Prices and Economic Development in Europe and Asia, 1500-1800, EHR 59/1 (2006), pp. 2-31; Id., “Lancashire, India and Shifting Competitive Advantage in Cotton Textiles, 1700-1850: The Neglected Role of Factor Prices,” EHR 62/2 (2009), pp. 279-305. By contrast Parthasarathi supports the idea of
29 high wages in India: Prasannan Parthasarathi, “Rethinking Wages and Competitiveness in the Eighteenth Century,” P&P 158 (1998), pp. 79-109; Id., “Historical Issues of Deindustrialisation in Nineteenth- Century South India,” in Giorgio Riello and Tirthankar Roy, eds., How India Clothed the World: the World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850 (Leiden: Brill, 2009), pp. 415-36. 42 See in particular Tirthankar Roy, “Knowledge and Divergence from the Perspective of Early Modern India,” JGH 3/3 (2008), pp. 361-87.

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