Calvin was initially just a lecturer not a pastor

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Calvin was initially just a lecturer not a pastor. Calvin’s character is less attractive, and his life less dramatic than Luther’s or Zwingli’s, but he left his Church in a much better condition.15This would lead to Protestantism spreading across Europe and it would eventually land on the shores of the New World in the form of Puritanism.What Does It All Mean For Us Today13Shelley, Bruce L. (Church History in Plain Language. Updated 4th ed. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2013) 261. 14Ibid 26215Philip Schaff and David S Schaff, History of the Christian Church(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1949). 227.6
So what would Christians think today if a Reformation of the Church were to be ignited? In the society and culture of today it could be seen just as blasphemous as many thought the Swiss and their German counterparts were. Though Zwingli is viewed by many to have major faults in his teachings and interpretation of the Bible, there should be doubt that the Swiss reformers did in fact help change the way of the church during their time. The church under Roman Catholic leadership had begun to systematically add a level of humanistic rituals to the burden of the people that served a purpose for themselves and not that of God and His people. The co-operative friendships between Luther and Melanchthon, between Zwingli and Oecolampadius, between Farel and Calvin, between Calvin, Beza, and Bullinger, are among the finest chapters in the history of the Reformation, and reveal the hand of God in that movement.16That leads to this statement, it has happened before it could happen again. In some ways the church and culture areon a collision course and neither of the two are flinching. Will a reformation be needed again, only God knows, but the reformation that was led by the great theologians and pastors of the Reformed movement in Europe definitely made a difference in the way people of faith were not only seen but heard!16Ibid 2287
BIBLIOGRAPHYBaker, J. Wayne. Church, State, and Dissent: The Crisis of the Swiss Reformation, 1531-1536.Church History57, no. 2 1988Erickson, Millard J, and L. Arnold Hustad. Introducing Christian Doctrine. Grand Rapids,Mich.: Baker Academic, 2001.Gordon, Bruce. Huldrych Zwingli. The Expository Times, 2015.Hill, Jonathan. Zondervan Handbook to The History of Christianity. Grand Rapids, Mich.:Zondervan, 2006.Nichols, Stephen J. The Reformation. Wheaton, Ill.: Crossway Books, 2007.Roth, John D, and James M Stayer. A Companion to Anabaptism and Spiritualism, 1521-1700.Leiden: Brill, 2007.Schaff, Philip, and David S Schaff. History of the Christian Church. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans,1949.Shelley, Bruce L. Church History in Plain Language. Updated 4th ed. Nashville: ThomasNelson, 2013. Stephens, W. Peter. Confessing the Faith: The Starting Point for Zwingli and Bullinger.Reformation & Renaissance Review: Journal of the Society for Reformation Studies 8,no. 1, April 2006Zwingli, Huldrich. Selected Works Of Huldrich Zwingli. Philadelphia: Longmans, Green & Co.,1901.Zwingli, Ulrich, The Latin Works and the Correspondence of Huldreich Zwingli. New York: G.P.Putnam's Sons, 1912.8
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