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Paper 1 - Final Draft

The relationship between george and elizabeth willard

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The relationship between George and Elizabeth Willard is one of the most significant relationships throughout Anderson’s novel. It displays the immaturity of both of their characters and how they fail to effectively react to their emotions. Most importantly, however, is how Elizabeth’s inability to grow emotionally affected George in the long run. Her inability to properly become a mature adult caused George to lack in his maturity as he grew up. Fussell and Szczesiul, the two scholars, have opposing takes on
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6 George’s growth: Fussell says he has grown, and Szczesiul does not think that he has. Despite the accuracy of Szczesiul’s evaluation, he does not mention the reason to George’s immaturity, which undermines his overall argument. The obvious influence of Elizabeth on her son suggests that the relationship between a mother and her child is very powerful and can have a lasting effect on the child. Word count: 1, 597
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7 Jung Works Cited Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio: Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Contexts, Criticism. Ed. Charles E. Modlin and Ray Lewis. New York: W. W. Norton. 1996. Print. Fussell, Edwin. “Winesburg, Ohio: Art and Isolation”. Modern Fiction Studies. Ed. Maurice Beebe. Vol. 6 1960. 106-114. Print. In this difficult and intensive reading, Fussell attempts to express his impressions on Winesburg, Ohio, the central setting of Anderson’s novel. He ultimately makes the connection between artistic success and the protagonist’s ability to succeed as a writer. Fussell goes as far as to say that George Willard has matured by the end of the novel, enough to be a successful writer. That’s the key difference that Edwin Fussell points out in his essay: apart from the other key characters in the novel, George has been able to accept the idea of isolation and being alone. This is what helps him mature compared to everyone else. Fussell has worked as a professor and an assistant professor in English at numerous universities. Additionally, he received both his Master’s Degree and Ph.D. at Harvard University. The work that Fussell has done during his writing career sheds a positive light on his credibility as a critic. His writings have been published in multiple presses in various educational institutions such as The University of California and Princeton. I find Fussell’s essay about Winesburg, Ohio to be problematic. It assumes that George Willard has matured over the course of the novel when Anderson provides ample evidence stating otherwise. However, the overall strength of his argument is convincing in itself.
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8 Szczesiul, Anthony E. “The Ambiguous Ending of Winesburg, Ohio : Putting George Willard’s ‘Departure in Perspective. 2-4. Print. Anthony Szczesiul has a more clear and obvious argument than compared to that of Edwin Fussell through the reading of his short, detailed analysis of Winesburg, Ohio . Szczesiul’s key point opposes that of Fussell’s: George Willard fails to mature during the course of the novel. He defends this claim with the idea that
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