Cavoukian nd Librarians should urge social media creators and maintainers to

Cavoukian nd librarians should urge social media

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(Cavoukian n.d.) Librarians should urge social media creators and maintainers to adopt policies that fit Privacy by Design guidelines and modify their activities to fell under Cavoukian's framework (NPR 2013). By demanding things such as "do not track" settings as the default setting in social media platforms and requiring social media providers to agree to remove content upon user request as boilerplate terms of service, librarians could turn the tides of privacy invasion by so- cial media corporations. The ALA can lead the call for social media privacy through amended terms-of-service con- tracts. The organization can urge libraries to push privacy standards for social media, and it can directly engage social media corporations as a powerful, national organization of information professionals. State and federal governments have successfully convinced social media provid-
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Social M edia Privacy m ers to modify contracts, proving that with enough motivation, social media companies will modify their terms of service, For example, the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) forced Facebook to revise standard terms of service for state and local gov- ernments through a special agreement (Vaughn 2orr). On a federal level, dozens of social me- dia companies have penned special modified terms-of-service agreements for federal agencies (Ross 2023). The amended contracts cede some control of social media content, including the placement, removability, and permanence of content, to the government (the "user”). These social media contracts also contain clauses in which social media providers promise not to set cookies in some situations, such as when a certain widget is used or when domains end with .gov or .mil (Tauberer 2009). Sample federal government user agreements are available online for model draft language. Undertaking a campaign involving contracts may seem somewhat outside the realm of librarianship. After all, librarians are not contract lawyers. However, the "People's Terms of Service" drafters urge us to recall the pessimism surrounding Creative Commons, an effort that drew on the collective power of artists and creators to better protect copyrighted works on the Internet. Although the Creative Commons plan initially sounded complex, involving dense legal copyright concepts and tricky Internet coding ideas, Creative Commons is now widely known to anyone searching for fair-use materials online. The "People's Terms of Ser- vice" drafters also remind us that the push for contract modification serves a greater ideo- logical purpose. The drafters say that even if companies don't rush to adopt consumers' terms, "there is a great value to advancing a common baseline for values and expectations in the on- line world" (Melber et al. 2013).
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