1 customer dissatisfaction 2 why a poor quality work

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1.Customer dissatisfaction2.Why?a.Poor quality work3.Why?a.Staffing issuesb.Project selection issues4.Why?a.Unbalanced staffing ratiosb.Decreased motivation5.Why?a.Accepted low quality projects6.Why?a.Lack of structure and strict criteria7.Why?a.Lack of or poor leadership8.Why?a.Lack of process in place for leadership trainingReferences
Wheatley, M. J. (2008). Self-organized networks: What are the leadership lessons?LeadershipExcellence, 25(2), 7–8.Retrieved July 14, 2017 from:-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/docview/204636823?accountid=14872Alissa-I agree that after using the 5 Whys analysis the root cause could be poor leadership.I likethe fact that you kept asking why until the actual root was discovered.Senge (2006) explainsthat leadership can be an organizational disability if the proper training and focus are not present.Wheatley (2008) suggests that leadership issues are also often underlying causes of workplaceinefficiency and poor process implementation.Your solution of having a qualified faculty member to mentor the team and leader alsomakes sense.I would add that having structured leadership classes with objectives, goals anddeliverables would benefit the group as well.The program should be restructured with a clearmission statement and strategy.Leadership (2ndyear students) must be willing to learn aboutleadership and apply these principles to this program and the team members.ReferencesSenge, P.M. (2006). The fifth discipline: The art & practice of the learning organization. NewYork, NY: Doubleday.Wheatley, M. J. (2008). Self-organized networks: What are the leadership lessons?LeadershipExcellence, 25(2), 7–8.Retrieved July 14, 2017 from:-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/docview/204636823?accountid=14872
Sarah-Your diagram is a great start to understanding the exact root of the problem that OCI isfacing.I agree that the bad reputation of the program stems from client dissatisfaction and lowquality work.However, I think in this case we need to ask more questions.We can do this by continuing to ask “why is this so?” and by using systems thinking.Senge (2006) explains how this perspective would have assisted us to grasp a true understandingof how components link together and interact. Systems thinking goes beyond looking at thevarious pieces of the puzzle but how these pieces effect each other.The final piece of the 5 Whys analysis is to develop a solution to the root issue.Typicallythese are process or systems failures.Seiter (2014) suggests that closing the loop with potentialsolutions is the key to driving change in a problem area.She explains that every root cause mustbe linked with a solution or solutions dependent on the findings.ReferencesSeiter, W. B., & More, L. W. (2014, December 15). The 5 Whys: A Simple Process to UnderstandAny Problem. Retrieved July 15, 2017, fromSenge, P.M. (2006). The fifth discipline: The art & practice of the learning organization. NewYork, NY: Doubleday.

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Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Business, Management, Senge, 5 Whys, Peter Senge, Moral Imagination

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