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; 10/34 conjunction with other tools and not interpreted singularly. This may prevent an overall understanding of opportunities if multiple analyses are not performed. Pie charts and bar graphs can be used to compare quantitative units in comparison to other items, such as budget, warehouse space, and hours labor. Histograms are useful when examining and comparing various data, especially statistical info and questionnaires of both customers and employees. Pareto charts are used to understand qualitative data, including the frequency of items such as the products receiving the most complaints or the services that receive the most customer service calls. Tree diagrams can be used to identify various tasks or inputs and outputs of processes. Flowcharts are great in identifying the various steps of a project or process and identifying who owns various parts of the project or process and identifying the next steps. PDCA is a four­step tool of TQM that involves planning all steps of the process, doing it in a test or trial format, checking the validity and effectiveness of the project, and making any changes if anything needs to be altered. All of these tools help an organization to have consistent measures to constantly evaluate if a product or process is being produced in the most efficient and effective manner. For example, within a process of changing the design of the production of a chair, an effective PDCA model could be implemented. A company would form a project team that includes various functions of the process. The planning would include a flowchart and any recommendations of changes throughout the existing process. The planning would be done from the beginning of the process through completion in order to identify any improvements. In the “do” step, the team would most likely complete one or more test chairs through the newly planned process. If part of the changes includes a line process, an ample amount of chairs would need to be completed using the newly planned method. The appropriate length and quantity of a test is determined in the planning process. The “check” element happens during and after the “do” step. If speed or quantity improvements are the improvement sought, the company will compare those critical data points to measure. As the final “action,” the plan will continue to be changed and tested or it will be implemented when the expected changes meet the goals of the project. Reference: Krajewski, L. J., Malhotra, M. K., & Ritzman, L. P. (2015). Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains (11 ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson. Total quality management (TQM) tools. (n.d.). Retrieved December 18, 2015, from .
2/21/2016 Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (...

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