E let x represent the average number of putts and y

Info icon This preview shows pages 360–364. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(e) Let x represent the average number of putts and y represent the average number of strokes. Use the definition of the correlation coefficient above to determine the measurement units of the correlation coefficient r in terms of putts and strokes. x y I II III I II IV III IV
Image of page 360

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chance/Rossman, 2015 ISCAM III Investigation 5.7 360 (f) If the correlation coefficient between two variables equals zero, what do you think the scatterplot will look like? (g) Suppose we find the correlation coefficient of a variable with itself. Substitute x i in for y i (and so x for y and s x for s y ) in the above equation. Simplify. What is the correlation coefficient equal to? (h) Do you think the correlation coefficient will be a resistant measure of association? Explain. (i) The following scatterplots display 7 pairs of variables for these golfers. Rank these graphs in order from strongest negative correlation to strongest positive correlation. A: B: C: D:
Image of page 361
Chance/Rossman, 2015 ISCAM III Investigation 5.7 361 E: F: G: (j) Use technology to determine the correlation coefficient for each of the above scatterplots x In R: > cor(x, y) x In Minitab: Choose Stat > Basic Statistics > Correlation and enter the pair of variables. You can unselect the “Show p - values” box for now. Alternatively, type MTB> corr cx cy. Record the values of these correlation coefficients below: Strongest negative birdie conversion and average putts Medium negative money and average score Weak negative money and average putts No association driving distance and average putts Weak positive money and driving distance Medium positive money and birdie average Strongest positive birdie average and birdie conversion (k) Based on these correlation coefficient values and/or the definition/formula, what do you think is the largest value that r can assume? What is the smallest value? [ Hint : It’s not zero.] Largest: Smallest: (l) If the association is negative, what values will r have? What if the association is positive? Strongest negative: Medium negative: Weak negative: No association: Weak positive Medium positive: Strongest positive:
Image of page 362

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chance/Rossman, 2015 ISCAM III Investigation 5.7 362 (m) What does a correlation coefficient equal to zero signify? (n) What does a correlation coefficient close to 1 or ± 1 signify? (o) Which has a stronger correlation coefficient with scoring average: driving distance or average putts? Does this support the cliché? Explain. Study Conclusions The correlation coefficient for scoring average and average putts indicates a moderately strong positive linear association ( r = 0.444) whereas the correlation coefficient for scoring average and driving indicates a weaker negative association ( r = ˗0 .265). This appears to support that putting performance is more strongly related to a PGA golfer’s overall scoring average than the golfer’s driving distance, as the cliché would suggest. We must keep in mind that these data are only for only the first 2.5 months of the season (when most golfers have played only around 6 8 events) and may not be representative of the scores and money earnings later in the year.
Image of page 363
Image of page 364
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern