Examine the principles of community policing and its importance in law

Examine the principles of community policing and its

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Examine the principles of community policing and its importance in law enforcement. Explain how it differs from traditional policing. Provide real-world scenarios to illustrate these differences.
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5 There are important principles of community policing, such as integrity, compassion, leadership, courage, and commitment. These principles are important because law enforcement agents have the power to determine the future of a person's life. They must be able to use sound judgement quickly to determine things such as if taking out their weapon and shooting someone who does not have a weapon is the only option of use of force they have. Or if arresting a mother of four kids for stealing food is doing more good than harm. Common methods of community policing include foot and bicycle patrols, partnerships with other organizations like community members and non-profit service providers as well as social media, visiting schools and encouraging neighborhood watch. Law enforcement should be proactive with their service to the community, build a healthy relationship with the community and be responsible for their actions while in the community. Community policing is much different than traditional policing because the goal of community policing is to partner with the communities and help solve problems and reduce criminal activity together. Officers are less authoritative and have more of a team work mind set. While traditional policing involves specialized units like narcotics divisions or detectives. The goal of traditional policing is to be reactive, and authoritative in the community (Roufa, 2019). Examine critically the four stages of the problem-solving process (SARA) and explain the importance of each stage. SARA: scanning, analysis, response, and assessment. It is the problem oriented policing strategy that has four steps for police officers to follow. The SARA process was created in 1987, by John Eck and William Spelman of the Newport News Police Department.
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6 The first step is Scanning, in this step, police officers should identify problems that are recurring and their respective results within their communities. After scanning police officers organize these issues by importance and then figure out ways to resolve the problems found. Which should lead to officer finding to root of the problem, the bigger picture. In the step of Scanning an officer should look for unlawful activity that is known in the area such as gang activity. Another example would be scanning for problems that already are existing in the area and would need to be observed closely. The second step is Analysis, in this step police officers will come to understand the causes of the problem and collect data on the problem. The analysis allows officers to pinpoint the current plan put in place to deal with the issues at hand and develop reasons for why the issues keep occurring. The way the officer decides to deal with the problem at hand will set the
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  • Fall '11
  • Dr.Gibson
  • Community oriented policing

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