Connotation is an implied additional meaning of a word For example in Robert

Connotation is an implied additional meaning of a

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is the basic, most specific meaning of a word. Connotationis an implied additional meaning of a word. For example, in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowing Evening,” the denotationof the word sleepin the last two lines is “the natural, periodically recurring physiological state of rest.However, sleepalso carries the additional connotation of death. When reading a poem, you must consider both the connotation and denotation of the words. Syntax A poet uses syntax, the arrangement of the words, to express meaning and convey feeling. Speakers who repeat themselves, break off abruptly in the midst of a thought, or reverse the standard order of the words, for example, reveal something about how they feel. For example, in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowing Evening,” the word order of the first line is inverted: Whose woods these are I think I know. The normal order would be: I think I know whose woods these are.In the normal order, emphasis falls on what the speaker knows or thinks he knows. However, in the word order used by Frost, emphasis falls on “the woods,” which are more important than what the speaker knows or thinks he knows. Additionally, Frost’s arrangement of words (syntax) has more rhythm than the normal word order, which reads like a casual statement. 2ndStanza 3rdStanza 4thStanza
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L3 Understanding Poetry (July, 2011; g:ASC:EngRead) Page 3 Imagery A poet uses imagery with the intention of triggering our memories, stimulating our feelings, and commanding our responses. An image is a concrete representation of a sense impression, feeling, or idea. Images appeal to one or more of our senses. For example, aural, tactile, and visual images appear in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowing Evening,” in which the speaker has stopped “between the woods and frozen lake” to listen to “the sweep of easy wind” and watch the fall of “downy” flakes of snow. These words embody aural images (the gentle sounds of wind blowing and snow falling), tactile images (the soft fluff of down and the feel of gently blowing wind), and visual images (the white flakes of snow). Figurative Language Language can be classified as either literal or figurative. When we speak literally, we mean exactly what each word conveys; when we use figurative language we mean something other than the actual meaning of the words. For example, when one person tells another to go jump in the lake, it can mean two things depending if the speaker is being literal (the speaker actually wants the other person to physically get into a body of water) or figurative (the speaker wants the other person to go away.) Common figures of speech found in poetry include: hyperbole or exaggeration (“I’ll die if I miss that game”); understatement (“Being burned alive is somewhat painful”); synecdoche or using a part to signify the whole (“Lend me a hand”); metonymy or substituting an attribute of a thing for the thing itself (“step on the gas”);personification, when things or abstract ideas are given human attributes (“the lettuce was lonely
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