child and while the files are very descriptive no contact information or last

Child and while the files are very descriptive no

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child, and while the files are very descriptive, no contact information or last names are provided within them, limiting the contact between birthparents and potential adoptive parents (Patricelli, 2019). A closed adoption is when there is absolutely zero contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents. The child is given to the adoption agency, and they decide who the child will go to (Patricelli, 2019). As well as different adoption types, there are also many different family environments that the child can be adopted into, such as step-parent adoption, adoption into an LGBT home, and adoption into transracial families. My Place in the Community My place within the adoption community is that I am adopted. When I was seven years old, my parents were driving me home from my older sister’s house when they told me that I was
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ISSUES OF IDENTITY IN ADOPTED CHILDREN 3 adopted. My niece, Bailey, they told me, was my younger sister, as well. That came as quite a shock, because Bailey and I were nothing alike. Although I was adopted, it did not change how I felt about my family, and how much I loved them. At first, I was embarrassed of it, almost ashamed. I felt as though my birthparents didn’t want me because I wasn’t good enough. I realize now that it was not at all what I thought. The circumstances of my adoption are complicated, but it was not at all that my birthparents didn’t want me. Although I was wanted, I still blame my adoption on my inability to form and maintain connections with other people. Overview of the Problem With adoption comes many different risks. One of the lesser addressed risks is the crisis of identity within the adoption community. There are 135,000 children who are adopted every year in the USA, and 428,000 children who remain in the foster system after that. (Adoption Network Law Center, 2019). That is an immense amount of people, and many of them are more than likely struggling with their own identity. Children who are growing up and maturing in the foster system, learning to fend for themselves, have it significantly harder than those who have already been adopted, but the children who have been adopted have issues that are equally as relevant. Many people who are adopted struggle with the idea for their whole life, wondering if they belong with their birth family, or their adopted parents. There are many reasons for people who are adopted to struggle with finding their own sense of self, such as the reason for their adoption, if they have siblings, how they resemble or do not resemble their birthparents (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2013). What I Already Know About the Problem It has been proven that adoption is a form of trauma, as it separates the infant from the mother at a very crucial time for bonding. The first few hours of an infant’s life are said to be the most important, as it connects them to their maternal figure; but in adopted children, their maternal figure is oftentimes being ripped away from them and they are left with a traumatic loss
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