Course Hero Logo

26 anequityisraisedifassuranceand

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 93 - 95 out of 952 pages.

26An equity is raised if assurance anddetrimental reliance are established, though the elements are not to be treated as watertightcompartments.27The equity raised is called a 'mere' equity, but the word 'mere' does not mean that therelief which may be granted is insignificant.28As Ribeiro PJ put it, the disparaging-sounding epithet 'mere'is used, as the passage from Lord Walker's judgment shows, to indicate that no proprietary interestaccrues to the claimant.293.07In deciding upon the relief, the court has a wide discretion to take into consideration all the circumstancesand decide whether it is unconscionable for a party to be permitted to deny that which he has directly orindirectly encouraged another to assume to his detriment, and if so, what is the minimum equity to dojustice to the claimant. This notion of 'unconscionability' is a separate element in making out a case ofproprietary estoppel, unifying and confirming the other elements.30Lord Walker's judgments inGillett vHolt,31Cobbe v Yeoman's Row Management,32andThorner v Major,33as well as those of Lord Scott ofFoscote in the latter two cases, are often cited as authorities on the modern approach to proprietaryestoppel. In Hong Kong, the essential elements of proprietary estoppel have been summarised inChanGordon v Lee Wai Hing:34The essential elements of proprietary estoppel are well known. The owner of land induces, encourages or allowsthe claimant to believe that he has or will enjoy some right or benefit over the owner's property (representation). Inreliance upon this belief, the claimant acts to his detriment to the knowledge of the owner (reliance). The owner thenseeks to take unconscionable advantage of the claimant by denying him the right or benefit which he expected toreceive (detriment). See Megarry and Wade,The Law of Real Property(7th Edn, 2008) pp 698-699 andThorner vMajor[2009] 1 WLR 776, per Lord Scott of Foscote.3.08Although proprietary estoppel is founded on the principle of unconscionability, and unconscionability ofconduct may well lead to a remedy, in Lord Scott's view, proprietary estoppel cannot be the route to aremedy unless the ingredients for a proprietary estoppel are present.352. ELEMENTS OF PROPRIETARY ESTOPPEL3.09Page 93
The doctrine of proprietary estoppel emerges from three classes of cases.36First, where a gift is intendedby X to Y, but the gift is incomplete because the appropriate formality is not complied with, and Y hasnevertheless acted on X's intention by incurring expenses on the subject matter of the intended gift. InDillwyn v Llewelyn,37a father allowed his son to have possession of his land and signed an informalmemorandum to the effect that the land should be given to the son as a gift for the purpose of providinghim with a house. On the strength of the promise and with the father's knowledge, the son incurredsubstantial expenditure to build a house on the land. Although there was no formal deed for the gift, andas a general rule, equity will not perfect an imperfect gift, Lord Westbury LC held that as the son hadincurred expenditure in reliance on the father's promise, he had acquired a right to call on the father toperform that contract and complete the imperfect donation which has been made.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 952 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
Alice Lee
Tags
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture