Now imagine that you were standing in line at the

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Now, imagine that you were standing in line at the cafeteria and overheard the following conversation: Abby: Oh my god, so yesterday I was just sitting at the cafeteria table and RAYMOND came  over and sat next to me! He is SO HOT.  Jessica: You mean, Raymond the boyfriend of Penelope? Abby: Yep, exactly that Raymond! He was totally flirting with me though.  Jessica. No way! He was flirting with you?! You gotta be kidding. Penelope sure wouldn’t be  happy to hear that! Abby: Oh, he was definitely flirting. He asked me a ton of questions about class that day. He  was all “I missed class so could you fill me in” but you KNOW that’s just an excuse! He was  totally trying to get to know me. Let’s say you’re friends with Penelope. Pretend that you are talking to her about the conversation. What would your conversation be like? Include the words “She said…” somewhere in your paraphrase (obviously you don’t need to use an APA style citation, but put quotation marks around any direct quote). Choose and use one of the three methods of paraphrasing described in the Wisconsin handout: A. Look away from the source; then write. … B. Take notes. … C. While looking at the source, first change the structure, then the words. (Wisconsin Writing Center, n.d., p. 4) PLEASE TYPE UP YOUR ANSWER BEFORE READING THE NEXT PAGE. Please send me two drafts if necessary: 1. The first draft you make BEFORE reading the rest of this handout; 2. If you wish, send also send me a second draft that incorporates the main points below.
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Exercise discussion: Think about: which method did you use and why? You probably just used the “Look away from the source and write” method. It’s easy to remember what they were talking about, and to put it in your own words to describe it to someone else along with our own interpretation. This is a relatively easy paraphrase. You probably told Penelope what, in general, Abby said, but you also should have added your own interpretation (e.g. whether or not Abby’s account was reliable) and analysis of what action Penelope should take (e.g. whether or not she should ask Raymond about it, whether she should get mad at Raymond, etc.). Most of what you’d say to Penelope would be your own words and ideas. We tell someone about things we heard or did every day, while using our own words. That’s exactly what you do in a paraphrase! The only difference is that you need to be more clear, in academic writing, about telling us exactly who said it and where (the citation). That’s like telling Penelope that you overheard some things Abby said in the cafeteria. Another difference is that the main purpose of academic writing is to develop and express new / your own ideas; that’s why we read what you wrote: to see what you’re thinking, and see if there’s a new way to think about or organize previous ideas/knowledge. So it’s important that you use others ideas only as a method of developing your own ideas or as support for your own ideas. Quotations should be used sparingly, and you need to always
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