There is even a point in which the speaker wishes

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There is even a point in which the speaker wishes that the love that was between the deceased and themself would “last forever.” However, reality does not necessarily work out well sometimes. You will face heartbreak, and pain, but there is only so much you could do. Regardless of how the speaker of this poem feels, intellectually, they are aware of the fact that once someone is gone, they are gone. It is something that everyone has to deal with. Death is painful time for everyone who has a connection to whoever death took away. Inside, the speaker knows that this person is gone, and all one can really do is reflect on the relationship that existed between the deceased and themself. They call the deceased “[their] North, [their] South, [their] East and West.” The speaker is in such pain, all they can do is remember how much they meant to them. It is the best thing they can do to remember the deceased. Emotionally, they want to cling on to this person for as long as possible, but they know, in their mind, that doing so is not the best idea. That is where that conflict between intellect and emotion is most prevalent in a time like this. You want to deny it, be angry, bargain, and be sad. Only after all those stages does your mind fully come in and help you come to accept what happened. The speaker is going through these stages, and while they want to change the outcome, they cannot. All they can do is be reasonable to themselves and to others, and grieve. They are not going to let their emotions control them, at least not for too long. It is okay to be sad, but it is not okay to let your feelings come before your intellect.
Works Cited Larkin, Philip. “Aubade by Philip Larkin.” Poetry Foundation , Poetry Foundation, . Accessed 29 Jan. 2021.

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