The emergency medical services team responds first

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The emergency medical services team responds first and transports the injured to the hospital. The emergency room team then takes over, providing medical care, followed by a recovery team. They all share the higher goal of saving lives. -Creating effective teams
The team effectiveness model makes two assumptions:Teams differ in form and structure. Teamwork is preferable to individual work. Creating ‘effective’ teams when individuals can do the job better is like solvingthe wrong problem perfectly. We can organise the key components of effective teams into three general categories. The resources and other contextual influences that make teams effective. The team’s composition. The process variables within the team that influence effectiveness. In order for teams to be effective a combination of conduct, compositions, work design, and process must be brought together to assist effectiveness in the teamThis model has two caveats- this model is only a general guide and it assumesthat teamwork is preferable to individual work-Contextual factorsThe four contextual factors most significantly related to team performance are:Adequate resources: teams are part of a larger organisation system; every work team relies on resources outside the group to sustain it. A scarcity of resources directly reduces the ability of a team to perform its job effectively and achieve its goals. As one study concluded, after looking at 13 factors related to group performance, ‘perhaps one of the most important characteristics of an effective work group is the support the group receives from the organisation’. This support
includes timely information, proper equipment, adequate staffing, encouragement and administrative assistanceLeadership and structure:Teams can’t function if they can’t agree on who is to do what and also ensure that all members share the workload. Agreeing on the specifics of work and how these fit together to integrate individual skills requires leadership and structure, either from management or from the team members themselves. It’s true that, in self-managed teams, team members absorb many of the duties typically assumed by managers. However, amanager’s job then becomes managing outside (rather than inside) the team. Leadership is especially important in multi-team systems, in which different teams coordinate their efforts to produce a desired outcome. Here, leaders need to empower teams by delegating responsibility to them, and they play the role of facilitator, making sure the teams work together rather than against one another. Teams that establish shared leadership by successfully delegating it are more effective than teams with a traditional single-leader structure.

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