e non autistic to have a cultural exchange with an octopus with interpretation

E non autistic to have a cultural exchange with an

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[i.e. non-autistic] to have a cultural exchange with an octopus with interpretation than it may be for a person with interpretation to comprehend someone who functions without it, primarily on the level of sensing [i.e. autistic]. (Williams 1998, p.107) Autistic Culture? 133 Copyright © 2005. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 7/13/2018 9:42 AM via UNIV OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN AN: 129875 ; Bogdashina, Olga.; Communication Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome : Do We Speak the Same Language? Account: s8491389
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Chapter 6 What Language Are They Speaking? I turned to see Kath crying. ‘I never thought he had any language,’ she said. ‘Now I see he does. I just don’t know how to speak it… We think it is we who have to teach autistic people…now I see it is us who have so much to learn from them.’ (Williams 1999b, p.170) I tried to grasp the Millers’ efforts. They tried equally hard to come to grips with mine… They were coming from a foreign place and speaking a foreign language just like I was. I began to see that given how totally different our underlying systems were, it was a miracle that we bothered at all. (Williams 1999c, pp.97–8) We assume that language is necessarily verbal (i.e. comprising of words). That is why we say that children are verbal if they can talk (no matter that their verbal output is just a combination of echolalic phrases) and that they are non-verbal if they cannot produce verbal output. Donna Williams brilliantly illustrates this misleading conclusion with a story about a ‘talking’ parrot: People buy a parrot and they think that they teach it to speak. In spite of teaching, the parrot learns (maybe he is bored out of his mind or learns he gets rewarded for performing). The people are impressed because they now have a ‘clever’ parrot. Their parrot can ‘do things’. An expert comes along and says the parrot only appears to speak. But the parrot did have language. Beyond cheap tricks, the parrot has always had language. Ithad and always will have its own. (Williams 1999c, p.20) 134 Copyright © 2005. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 7/13/2018 9:45 AM via UNIV OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN AN: 129875 ; Bogdashina, Olga.; Communication Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome : Do We Speak the Same Language? Account: s8491389
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As the original experience of the world of autistic children is sensory-based, their original internal language (as a tool of formulation and expressing thoughts) consists of sensory-perceptual (multidimensional) images. This ‘language’ becomes central to their intellectual and emotional development.
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