He did not seek to write works that expressed

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He did not seek to write works that expressed emotions, developed material, or had a logical unfolding of events.
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John Cage (1912–1992) Influenced by Zen Buddhism, he created opportunities for experiencing sounds as themselves, not as vehicles for the composer’s intentions. Three strategies for achieving this goal Chance Indeterminacy Blurring boundaries between music, art, and life
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Chance music Some of the decisions normally made by a composer are left to chance. Such pieces do not convey the composer’s intentions. His approach varied from work to work.
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Chance music Music of Changes for piano (1951) The title is taken from the ancient Chinese book of prophecy I-Ching (Book of Changes), which offers a method of divination by tossing coins. Cage devised charts for possible sounds, dynamics, durations, and tempos. The methods described in I-Ching were used to select the sounds of a given performance. As a result, sounds occur randomly
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Music of Changes
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Indeterminacy Certain aspects of the music are unspecified. The exact sound for Concert for piano and orchestra (1957–58) will vary from performance to performance. 4'33'' (Four Minutes Thirty-Three Seconds, 1952) has the performer sit in silence for this amount of time, thereby allowing the environmental noises to constitute the music.
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The score of Cage’s 4’33” , as published by Edition Peters
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Indeterminacy In both, the listener is invited to hear sounds as music. Value judgments are irrelevant; there can be no mistakes.
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Blurring boundries Variations IV (1963) uses both indeterminacy and chance and can be combined with other activities, including those of daily life. Musicircus (1967) has any number of musicians performing different music all at once, while the audience wanders freely.
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Morton Feldman (1926–1987) New York composer associated with abstract expressionist painters, including Jackson Pollock Feldman helped inspire Cage toward indeterminacy.
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Morton Feldman (1926–1987) Projection I for solo cello The notation uses boxes instead of noteheads, leaving specific pitches up to the player. Timbre and rhythm are specified. By deemphasizing pitch, Feldman focuses the listener’s attention on other aspects.
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Earle Brown (1926–2002) Brown was also a member of the New York group around Feldman and Cage. December 1952 (1952) The graphic notation specifies nothing. The music can be placed in any orientation or played in any direction. The performer must interpret the written symbols.
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December 1952
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Earle Brown (1926–2002) He developed another approach to indeterminacy in his “open form” pieces. The mobiles of Alexander Calder inspired this approach. Music is scored with some leeway in choice of pitches.
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