A culture whose members feel loyalties and

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A culture whose members feel loyalties and obligations to an in-group such as one’s extended family, community or even the organization one works for Depth: In the social penetration model, it is the second dimension of self-disclosure; here the people interacting shift from relatively unrevealing messages to more personal ones
Distorted Feedback: Information that can skew a person’s self-concept; such feedback might be excessively favorable because of other’s less than honest behavior (Example: A boss may claim to. Be an excellent manager because his assistants pour on false praise in order to keep their jobs) Equivocal Language: Ambiguous language that has two or more equally plausible meanings Face: The image an individual wants to project to the world Facework: Actions people take to preserve their own and other’s presenting images Identity Management: The communication strategies people use to influence how others view them Individualistic Culture: A culture in which people view their primary responsibility as being to themselves Johari Window: A model that describes the relationship between self-disclosure and self-awareness Lie: A deliberate act of deception Myth of Perfection: Along with the obsolete information and distorted feedback, another cause for low self-esteem or skewed self-concept that is common in our society. From the time most of us learn to understand language, we are exposed to models who appear to be perfect at whatever they do. As we grow up though we learn that this “perfection” is a facade. Negative Mood: A state of being where people view themselves more harshly than the facts warrant. People are more critical of themselves when they are experience negative moods than when they are feeling more positive Obsolete Information: Information that can skew a person’s self-concept; such information is usually outdated and unhelpful to the person in question Perceived Self: The person we believe ourselves to be in moments of candor. It may be identical with or different from presenting and desired selves Presenting Self: The image a person presents to others. It may be identical with or different from the perceived and desired selves Reference Groups: Groups against which we compare ourselves, which thereby influence our self-concept and self- esteem Reflected Appraisal: The theory that a person’s self-concept matches the way the person believes others regard him or her Self-Concept: The relatively stable set of perceptions each indicial holds him or herself Self-Control: The ability to change (one’s thoughts, behaviors, emotions, etc.) in order to conform to an expectation Self-Disclosure: The process of deliberately revealing information about oneself that is important and that would not normally be known by others
Self-Esteem: The part of the self-concept that involves evaluations of self-worth Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: A person’s expectations of an event and his or her subsequent behavior based on those

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