3 the fact that taxpayers paid for chil drens

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 10 pages.

3. The fact that taxpayers paid for chil-dren’s education created an incentive toseek an inexpensive teaching force, ush-ering in the feminization of the teachingprofession.4.Changing patterns in youth employmentand training meant that large numbers ofyoungsters in the 1830s and later escapedthe watchful eyes of their families.C. Public Life, the Press, and PopularAmusements1. Innovations in printing technology aswell as rising literacy rates created a briskmarket in the 1830s for publicationsappealing to popular tastes.2. By the 1830s, there were eight hundrednewspapers in print, sixty-five of themdailies.3. Starting in the 1830s, traveling lecturerscrisscrossed the country, bringing enter-tainment and instruction to small-townaudiences.4.Theater also blossomed in the 1830s, pro-viding urban Americans with their mostcommon form of shared entertainment.5.The popularity of theaters exemplified ageneral cultural turn toward the celebra-tion of public speech.IV.Democracy and ReligionA.The Second Great Awakening1.The earliest manifestation of fervent pietymarking the start of the Second GreatAwakening appeared in 1801 in Ken-tucky; by the 1810s and 1820s, campmeetings had spread to the Atlanticseaboard states.CHAPTER 11THE EXPANDING REPUBLIC, 1815–1840 91
2.The gatherings attracted women and menhungry for a more immediate access tospiritual peace, one not requiring years ofsoul-searching.3.Ministers adopted an emotional style andinvited an immediate experience of con-version and salvation.4. From 1800 to 1820, church membershipdoubled in the United States, much of itamong the evangelical groups.5.The leading exemplar of the Second GreatAwakening was lawyer-turned-ministerCharles Grandison Finney, who directedhis message primarily at men and womenof the business classes.6. Finney argued that a reign of Christianperfection loomed, one that wouldrequire public-spirited outreach to theless-than-perfect to foster their salvation.7. Finney adopted Jacksonian-era tactics tosell his cause: publicity, argumentation,rallies, and speeches.B. The Temperance Movement and the Cam-paign for Moral Reform1. The evangelical disposition — a combi-nation of faith, energy, self-discipline,and righteousness — animated vigorouscampaigns to eliminate alcohol abuse anderadicate sexual sin. 2. Alcohol consumption had risen steadilyin the decades up to the 1830s.3. Organized opposition to drinking firstsurfaced in the 1810s among health andreligious reformers.4. In 1826, Lyman Beecher founded theAmerican Temperance Society, whichheld that drinking led to poverty, idle-ness, crime, and family violence.5.In 1836, leaders of the temperance move-ment regrouped into a new society, theAmerican Temperance Union, whichdemanded total abstinence from itsadherents.6. The intensified war against alcoholmoved beyond individual moral suasioninto the realm of politics.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture